Protecting the Assets

August 27, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News

Evolphin Software has launched the next generation of its enterprise-class software solution, Zoom 5.0, which was built from the ground up on Evolphin’s patent-pending RevDB (NoSQL) database architecture – optimized to handle massive structured and unstructured digital content. This interesting news came to us from IT News Online in their article, “Evolphin Software Releases New Zoom 5.0 Digital Asset Management Solution.”

According to Evolphin, Zoom 5.0 goes beyond the limitations of traditional digital asset management solutions (DAMs) with respect to handling rich content like video and broadcast media assets. The end goal is to help users improve creativity, collaboration, communications, and overall workflow.

Improved workflow and a streamlined process can result in an immediate return on investment. Benefits extended beyond cost savings to include stronger integration between departments.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Big Data as a Tool for Historians

August 26, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News

Big data has accumulated quite the reputation. Many possibly exaggerated claims have been made about its potential. Nothing short of saving lives and the universe, of course. But can it rewrite history? This interesting topic was found on BBC News in their article, “Can computers replace historians?”

Probably not, but it is certainly working on the future and where the world is heading next. Using a tool called Google Big Query, designed for interrogating vast collections of data, scientists and historians can sift through a database of events stretching back to 1979. The project known as GDELT has collected media reports of events from innumerable sources in more than 100 languages for 35 years.

“What we did here,” Kaleev Leetaru, data scientist at Washington’s Georgetown University, explains, “was use this tool to shove in a quarter of a billion records and use this massive piece of software to just in a few minutes sift out the patterns in this data.” He found complex patterns of events repeating themselves over the years. Leetaru says that historians should see this tool as just another technique amongst many, rather than a threat to their professional expertise.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Auto-classification Tools for Polyhierarchical Taxonomies

August 26, 2014  
Posted in Autoindexing, metadata, News, Standards, Taxonomy

How effective are auto-classification tools for subject-based, polyhierarchical taxonomies? That was the subject of a recent LinkedIn discussion. It is important to remember that when using and creating custom taxonomies for subject classification, the results are well received. However, polyhierarchy can enable better and more accurate term coverage, as long as ambiguity is avoided. As a matter of fact, polyhierarchy is highly desirable for dealing with multidisciplinary subjects.

Good results are dependent on good rule building. Good rules are not limited to noun identification, nor are they constrained by hierarchical position, especially when they take full advantage of truncation and character string proximity conditions. At Access Innovations, we have never had any problems with polyhierarchy and getting proper postings from the automatic system. We do follow the standards, which specify tagging at the most specific level. When there are multiple broader terms and a full path or breadcrumb trail is needed for the content management system (CMS), we include all the paths to the terms as separate listings, rather than a single list. This provides better retrieval for the user and more relevant results.

It is unfortunate that some CMS system designers and users still think that finding web pages is like filing physical books in a library, rather than seeing the opportunity for multiple avenues of access to a digital object as allowed by a computer.

Proper indexing against a strong standards-based taxonomy increases the findability of data. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Using Data to the Maximum

August 26, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News

A new partnership of the French IT services group Bull and search and analytics company Sinequa is positioned to provide an appliance based on Bull’s Bullion X86 server and Sinequa’s real-time Big Data search and analysis software platform. This interesting information came from telecompaper in their article, “Bull, Sinequa to offer real-time Big Data appliance.”

Together, these firms predict that they will be able to offer a secure, integrated appliance capable of handling 100 billion records and processing 10 million indexed records a second. In addition, the appliance can be fully integrated with the client’s access security policies.

It is important to choose the right partner in technology, especially when your content is in their hands. Access Innovations is known as a leader in database production, standards development, and creating and applying taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Crowd Sourcing Taxonomies

August 25, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

The American Historical Association (AHA) recently put together a draft revision of its taxonomy of the discipline and is inviting comment from members as it moves toward a final form of the document. The deadline for comment is September 30. This interesting topic was found on the U.S Intellectual History Blog in their post, ‘The Celestial Emporium of Historical Knowledge.”

This crowd sourced project starts with the list of subfields from which those joining, or renewing their membership in, the AHA select when describing their professional interests. These self-descriptions become the basis for the AHA’s understanding of the overall shape of the discipline, no small matter for the principal professional organization of historians. The downfall to this is the limitation of only three categories and that the contributions can only come from members of AHA.

The blogger also added an interesting observation — “One final thought: it does seem to me that digital technology might allow the AHA to ditch the old three-category limit or, with a little more effort, replace the simple list of thematic subfields with some sort of thematic schema that provides more of a sense of the relationship of these subfields to each other.” Of course, that doesn’t fix the membership issue.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Digging a Little Deeper

August 25, 2014  
Posted in News, search, semantic

Semantic search combines natural language processing and computer technology to help people learn and share information quickly. How it is used and the different types of applications seems endless. After a car accident and subsequent coma ended up leaving one woman having to relearn how to do everything, she saw a need and built a semantic search company to discover the not-so-obvious information.

The technology behind Declara helps people discover esoteric and hard-to-find information. Declara has been used in education, pharmaceutical, and manufacturing industries, where a lack of knowledge transfer between employees could result in death. Tech Investor News brought this information to our attention in their article, “Semantic search will help find hidden knowledge in education and more.”

Semantic technology continues to grow and expand its uses. Search is just one of those. Access Innovations, developer of the M.A.I. machine-assisted indexing system, specializes in complex coding, tagging, and indexing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

What Else Can You Do With a Thesaurus?

August 22, 2014  
Posted in News

Have an old Roget’s lying around? If you follow in this girl’s footsteps you just might have a new wardrobe. Huffington Post brought this odd but interesting news in their article, “Thesaurus Dress Sold To Ripley’s Believe It Or Not.” In this day and age of sustainability, recycling, upcycling and trash-to-treasures, we should not be surprised by any repurposing efforts. Yet we are.

A Vancouver actress and model made a dress out of pages from a thesaurus. As if that isn’t a story on its own, the outfit has been sold to Ripley’s Believe It Or Not. Jori Phillips made waves last summer when her dress, which she cut and glued together for a costume at the Denman Island Readers and Writers Festival, went viral. “It feels like a fairy tale,” said Phillips. We would agree.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Improving Upon Records Management

August 22, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News

AMCAD has started working on a document management project with Arizona’s Pinal County Clerk of the Superior Court. The plan is to scan and index approximately five million images in six months’ time. This monumental task is part of a larger long-term records management strategy for the Clerk of the Superior Court. Upon completion, they will eliminate thousands of square feet of files and shelving. The digitization project will enhance security and improve access by the court and public. This interesting information came from Broadway World in their article, “AMCAD Begins Work Under Critical Document Management Contract With Arizona’s  Pinal County Clerk of the Superior Court.”

Considering the mammoth amount of data available, both digital and non-digital, the benefits to going digital go beyond access and findability. It is all about preserving data.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Embracing Semantic Technology

August 22, 2014  
Posted in News, semantic

Cipher Systems has announced a new partnership with Semantic Research Inc. Together they will work together to integrate elements of SRI’s Semantica® software package and Cipher’s Knowledge.Works™ and Knowledge.Hub™ competitive intelligence software solutions. Digital Journal brought this interesting news to our attention in their article, “Cipher Systems Partners with Semantic Research to Extend Data-Intensive Analytics Solutions to Commercial Markets.”

“To make smart strategic decisions, our clients need to fully understand the business ecosystems in which they operate,” said Peter Grimm, Managing Director of Cipher. “SRI’s technology and approach builds on our existing capabilities to support companies seeking to better understand their competitors’ strategy, target key customer segments, detect fraud, optimize supply chains, or examine potential acquisition candidates. We are pleased to partner with a leader in network-focused analysis to bring new capabilities to our clients.”

Semantic technology requires a special knowledge of terminology and coding to reduce errors. Access Innovations, developer of the M.A.I. machine-assisted indexing system and specializing in complex coding, tagging, and indexing, provides a range of services that deliver tag integrity.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

A Taxonomy for Contributor Role Metadata

August 21, 2014  
Posted in Access Insights, News, Taxonomy

We’ve written before about how taxonomies can provide the material for metadata (especially subject matter terms) describing information resources. One taxonomy currently under development has the potential to standardize how authors and other contributors are described in a resource’s metadata. The development group is led by Amy Brand (VP Academic & Research Relations and VP North America for Digital Science) and Liz Allen (Head of Evaluation for the Wellcome Trust).

An article published yesterday in the Scholarly Kitchen on the contributor role taxonomy includes an interview with Dr. Brand, who described the active involvement of scholarly publishers, institutions, and others in the development group:

“The contributorship effort has been highly collaborative from the start. We are working closely with the Wellcome Trust evaluation team, and have some financial support from Wellcome as well. Publishers including Nature, Elsevier, PLOS, AAAS, and APS have been involved at various stages in the project. We also had some help early on from Access Innovations. And individuals from several institutions, including Cornell, Harvard, MIT, Columbia, NIH and NSF have been engaged as well. We are currently collaborating with both CASRAI (the Consortia Advancing Standards in Research Administration Information) and NISO in the development of the taxonomy.”

Access Innovations is proud to have been involved in this effort and we look forward to future collaborations along the way.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

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