Classifying Order

February 25, 2015  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News

Standards are important for many reasons. Consistency creates quality, and standards create consistency. Professional standards for archival descriptions involve a hierarchical structure. This ensures that users will find your archival database easy to navigate. This interesting topic came from the blog, Eloquent, in their post, “Understanding Archival Hierarchies.”

Sometimes, figuring out where to start is the biggest hurdle. We found this video presentation helpful for users to figure out how to create the structure as the data is entered. Other applications also contain hierarchical structures, which are the classification scheme for records and the storage locations for physical items. This second video presentation illustrates the ease of managing any hierarchical structure using Web-based software.

Developing a classification system organized into conceptually similar categories can help users gain a better understanding of the taxonomy subject area. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

The Impact of Social Media

February 24, 2015  
Posted in News

Social media has changed many things. Communication, marketing, and news – to name just a few of the obvious ones. A recent survey report issued by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project indicates that the internet and social media are integral to the arts in America. Add one more to the aforementioned list. This interesting information came to our attention from All Things Strings in their article, “New Survey Finds Digital Media is a Powerful Tool But Also a Mixed Blessing for Arts Organizations.”

Digital technologies, including websites and social media, are having a major impact on arts organizations, but the survey also found that digital technologies are a mixed blessing, contributing to attention-span problems, providing unfiltered criticism of programming, and consuming valuable staff time.

On the other side of the coin, digital technology, the internet, and social media are giving arts organizations new ways to promote events and engage with audiences.

I appreciate research statistics and the insights that they can provide into the motivation and outcomes of users. There are many provided in this article, which is well worth the time to read. One particular finding jumped out at us, though.

Most of the participating organizations strongly or somewhat agree with the statements that technology and social media have made art a more participatory experience (92%), and that they have helped make art audiences more diverse (83%). However, these arts organization respondents also say that technology contributes to an expectation that “all digital content should be free” (74%).

I think that leads to an entirely new set of survey questions.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

More Webinars for This Week

February 24, 2015  
Posted in News

School is in session, as there are more webinar and learning opportunities to share. The Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM) is conducting webinars in partnership with leading industry analysts and consulting firms. Your questions and comments are welcome for live Q&A during each event. These webinars are free and last about one hour.

The first two are this week starting on February 25 with, “How Are You Connecting and Optimizing SharePoint?” In this webinar, AIIM President John Mancini will update you on the latest AIIM research conducted in early 2015. He’ll examine the trends over the years and will distill what you need to know to benchmark yourself against this extensive research.

On Thursday, February 26, the same webinar will be held, but focused especially on our UK and European community and offered at 2:00 p.m. British Time (3:00 p.m. Central Europe Time).

For a complete schedule of AIIM webinars, go here.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Start Planning Now

February 24, 2015  
Posted in News

KMWorld 2015 seems far away in November, but the planning is already underway. The planning team is seeking experienced and knowledgeable experts who can provide practical, hands-on information, case studies, and instruction that will maximize the value of the conference attendees’ technological investments. Topics should include search, content, enterprise, and knowledge management, but the core component should be focused on agility. Agile can mean applying an incremental and iterative approach, or evolving through collaboration between self-organizing and cross-functional teams to promote early delivery and continuous improvement, and to encourage rapid and flexible response to change.

To participate in KMWorld 2015 as a possible speaker or workshop leader, or suggest a speaker, post your submission no later than March 27, 2015. Share your story at KMWorld.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Webinar Opportunity This Week

February 23, 2015  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

We always like to share learning opportunities with our readers. One upcoming webinar should be of interest. It’s titled, “5 Key Elements to a Successful Ecommerce Product Taxonomy.” This is scheduled for Wednesday, February 25 at 11:00 a.m. (EST).

Nicholas Goupil, Product Marketing Manager for Informatica PIM and MDM, will be the host as Mark Leher from WAND will review five of the key elements that anybody with a product catalog should be thinking about to best organize the product data in their catalog. A brief demonstration of the WAND eCommerce Taxonomy will also be included.

True taxonomies can help manage big data by providing a solid standards-based taxonomy to index against. The results are comprehensive and consistent search results. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies because of consistency.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Better Analytics, Better Data

February 23, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News

Cambridge Semantics and SPARQL City are collaborating to offer an integrated graph analytics solutions with semantic understanding to help enterprises get better understanding and value from big data. This interesting information came from Virtual Strategy Magazine in their article, “Cambridge Semantics and SPARQL City Forge Partnership to Offer Interactive Big Data Search, Analytics & Data Management Solutions.”

Cambridge Semantics offers Anzo Smart Data Platform (Anzo SDP), leveraged by customers and partners for building interactive Smart Data solutions that help enterprises discover, analyze, and manage data from diverse sources. SPARQL City’s Hadoop-based graph analytics engine provides a way for people to query semi-structured and structured data and find more nuanced relationships within and across these datasets in graphical representations.

Findability works only when a proper taxonomy is in place. Proper indexing against a strong standards-based taxonomy increases the findability of data. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

The End

February 20, 2015  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

Building a solid taxonomy takes time, lots of time. However, a well-constructed and systematically applied taxonomy can unify all of the various assets, and in the process can itself become a valuable repository of institutional knowledge and a source of competitive advantage for the organization.

A taxonomy which includes all of the major terms and concepts of the disciplines addressed by the organization, one that is robust enough to include rules for disambiguating similar or closely related terms, with a systematic mechanism for acquiring, evaluating, and adding new terms, offers a number of potential applications.

However, remember that any comprehensive taxonomy is never finished. The best taxonomies are carefully managed, updated, and improved over time. This topic was inspired by the article, “Plant conservation now a passion for ‘dorky kid’“, found in Science Network. New plant species are being discovered in Western Australia at a rate greater than anywhere else in the world.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

The Future of Intelligent Technology

February 20, 2015  
Posted in News, semantic, Technology

The terms semantic technology, natural language processing, machine learning, and artificial intelligence are often used together and sometimes interchangeably. This interesting information came from DATAVERSITY in their article, “A Look Into the Future of Machine Learning.”

Artificial intelligence attempts to understand how our brain accomplishes what seem to us as menial tasks. There have been a few highlights of success, but in very limited and controlled settings.

David Karger, a professor of Computer Science at MIT, recently wrote on Forbes, “I think that the long-term future of machine learning is very bright (and that we will ultimately solve AI [artificial intelligence], although that’s a separate issue from ML [machine learning]).”

Artificial intelligence has the potential to become a monster business. In the next decade, our software’s ability to interact with the wide world around it, rather than simply produce a carefully structured and sterilized representation of that world, may be what makes or breaks business models.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Metadata is Your Friend

February 20, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News

Metadata has taken a serious blow. Despite the value it adds to findability and comprehensive search, the fear that “big brother” was listening in on every phone call you had with your mother made metadata a bad word. This interesting topic came from The Hill in their article, “NSA chief: Paris-style attack ‘makes life a lot harder‘.

Perspective is key here. The tragedy of the attacks in Paris last month provides that much-needed perspective. The sadness and horror that happened illustrates an increasing challenge for intelligence officials.

We now rely on properly applied metadata to search at the speed we need to find the data we seek. However, if you don’t have the data properly indexed against a solid taxonomy to begin with, searching with speed will not get you very far.

A strong standards-based taxonomy is one with true integrity. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Hands-on Learning

February 19, 2015  
Posted in Access Insights, News

The Data Harmony Users Group Meeting continued today with a presentation by Paul G. Kotula of the Materials Characterization department at Sandia National Laboratories. In the presentation, “Six Months of Work in the Lab will Save You Half a Day in the Library or 30 Minutes Online”, he shared his experience as both a consumer and a producer of peer-reviewed, published scientific literature.

Paul is an award-winning author, researcher, and peer reviewer who knows his stuff and knows how our clients use the content that our software enriches. During his presentation, he got specific about how people in his field use information and how researchers use collections.

Today wrapped up the case studies. Over the next two days there will be specific hands-on training, networking, and learning opportunities for the clients. Everyone seems to be eager to get their hands “dirty” and the Access Innovations staff are here and available to answer any questions.

Don’t forget to like our Facebook page to keep up with the latest news and information.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

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