More and More Digital

September 18, 2014  
Posted in News

We have talked a lot lately about digital projects. In today’s increasingly digital world, it is important that the American public has access to all appropriate federal government communications to improve transparency and increase trust. In his first day in office, President Obama signed the memorandum on Transparency and Open Government, calling for a new era of open and accountable government. Yet here we are five years after the president’s commitment and the government has yet to deliver. Federal Times brought this topic to our attention in their article, “Hybrid records management can enable open government.”

Given that the federal government is the single largest producer of information in the United States, moving towards digital information seems like an obvious route. Though digitization of information does produce a number of benefits, it doesn’t mean that everything should or can be converted to digital. There can be an improved workflow, and a streamlined process can result in an immediate return on investment. Benefits extend beyond cost savings to include stronger integration between departments.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Digitizing With Consistency

September 17, 2014  
Posted in indexing, News, Standards

Digitizing documents is a daunting task, especially when those documents are ancient. This information came from The Ancient World Online blog in their post, “Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece from Knowledge Unlatched.”

The first volume on antiquity to appear online in open access in the context of Knowledge Unlatched is now available. Published by De Gruyter, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece explores the nature of oaths as Greeks perceived it, the ways in which they were used (and sometimes abused) in Greek life and literature, and their inherent binding power.

The important factor of digital indexing is consistency, and what provides consistency? Standards. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

The Similarities of Color

September 17, 2014  
Posted in News

As we know, a thesaurus lists words grouped together according to similarity of meaning. In the past I have entertained you with interesting taxonomies, so know that I am equally excited to share this unique thesaurus, called the Color Thesaurus, with you. In the world of taxonomies, it may have its downfalls, for instance, the shortcomings of depending on the statistics of letter matches to determine the intent of a search string.

However, from an artistic standpoint, this thesaurus makes me happy, because not only do you find similar colors, you find the antonyms or the opposite colors, which are always the most flattering when demonstrated together in art, clothing, jewelry, etc.

Now I know that if I use sour apple in an art piece, vermillion would be complementary. This may not be life changing, but it is a reference I will bookmark.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

How to Make Content Findable

September 17, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, search

Effective records management training is important to reduce errors and access/use organized information effectively. Most organizations know this, including the Bahamian government. The Ministry of the Public Service and its Public Service Centre for Human Resource Development recently held a Records Management Training Workshop in response to a mandate to train clerical officers and supervisors in records management throughout the public service. The overall objective is to provide practical exposure to senior officers and supervisors. This interesting news came from Bahamas Tribune 242 in their article, “Training Session Aims To Improve Efficiency And Reduce Errors.”

Any records management system requires a system of indexing to create findability. We know that indexing against a strong, standards-based taxonomy can ensure comprehensive search results. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ISO/ANSI/NISO compliant taxonomies to produce comprehensive results.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

New Financial Taxonomy Available for Review

September 16, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) recently released the proposed 2015 GAAP Financial Reporting Taxonomy for public review and comment. The deadline to submit written comments is October 31, 2014. The taxonomy is a list of computer-readable financial reporting labels coded in eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL), an open-source computer language that allows companies to tag the financial data. The tags allow users of financial statements to electronically search for, assemble, and process data. Business Wire brought this news to us in their article, “2015 GAAP Financial Reporting Taxonomy Available for Public Review and Comment.”

The proposed 2015 GAAP Financial Reporting Taxonomy contains updates for accounting standards and other recommended improvements to the official taxonomy. The 60-day comment period is intended to allow users of the taxonomy to provide feedback on these updates.

The most cumbersome part of generating accurate XBRL documents is the searching of correct concept definitions. Tagging the financial data will improve the search feature and thus the findability of data.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Tackling the Big Data

September 16, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News

Researchers at the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Infection and Global Health are building the world’s most comprehensive database describing human and animal pathogens. This big data project will be used to prevent and tackle disease outbreaks around the globe. This interesting information came from Phys.org in their article, “Using ‘Big Data’ approach to map relationships between human and animal diseases.” The Enhanced Infectious Diseases (EID2) database has been developed by the Liverpool University Climate and Infectious Diseases of Animals (LUCINDA) team and is funded by a BBSRC Strategic Tools and Resources Development Fund grant.

EID2 is using openly accessible information in a new way and thereby tracing the history of human and animal diseases to predict the effects of climate change on pathogens and in turn to produce maps showing which diseases are most likely in particular areas and to categorize the complex relationships between human and animal carriers and hosts of numerous pathogens. The project has far-reaching possibilities. It will be interesting to watch as it develops and evolves.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Semantics and Insects

September 16, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, semantic

The Societas Europaea Lepidopterologica has recently joined efforts with Pensoft Publishers to bring the Society’s journal, Nota Lepidopterologica, to the world of open access. The first open access issue of the journal has been published. Knowledgespeak brought this interesting news to us in their article, “Societas Europaea Lepidopterologica journal Nota Lepidopterologica goes advanced open access with Pensoft Publishers.”

Societas Europaea Lepidopterologica is the European society for the study of moths and butterflies and for the conservation of these insects and their natural habitats. The scope of the journal has not changed. It continues to publish contributions to the study of mainly Palaearctic Lepidoptera, including taxonomy, morphology and anatomy, phylogenetics, biogeography, ecology, behavior, and conservation, as well as other aspects of lepidopterology.

The new online format of the journal is semantically enriched and brings new benefits and features, including tightening up the waiting time from acceptance to publication.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

New Descriptors Allow for More Comprehensive Searches

September 15, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News, search

The European Training Thesaurus (ETT) is Cedefop’s controlled vocabulary used to index the VET-Bib (the Reference Library of Vocational Education and Training in Europe) bibliographic database. Cedefop is the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training. This interesting news came straight from the source in their release, “Cedefop’s European Training Thesaurus – new descriptors – 2014 update.”

Over 100 new descriptor terms were added in 2014 to keep track of VET development and to assist researchers in tweaking their search strategies. Now all new descriptors of the European Training Thesaurus are sorted by microthesauri and have been fully integrated in VET-Bib database for searchability and findability.

Information being findable is the result of good indexing and comprehensive metatagging. Automated indexing is a comprehensive approach to making content findable. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies with integrated indexing rule bases to make their information findable.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

New Thesaurus Edition Promises Linked Open Data

September 15, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News

The 2014 edition of the CAB Thesaurus was published this summer (July 2014) by CABI, an inter-governmental, not-for-profit organization seeking to improve people’s lives worldwide by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment. This interesting news came to our attention by InfoDocket in their article, “Agriculture, Life Sciences, Health: Access New Edition of CAB Thesaurus Published Online.”

The new thesaurus has been integrated into all of CABI’s publishing processes. Changes since the previous edition (September 2012) include the following:

  • All 1300 full datasheets in the Aquaculture Compendium were reviewed and missing species, diseases names, etc. were added.
  • Reptiles were completely reviewed and many species added and taxonomy corrected.
  • All plant disease common names have been standardized as used in the Crop Protection Compendium.
  • Sample data files for download were updated. The full thesaurus files are available in several formats on request.
  • The total number of terms has grown by 5.7% to 264,518. The CAB Thesaurus is available in eleven languages.

The next edition of the thesaurus is planned for early 2016. Despite the many upgrades in this latest version, many more are in the works for the next edition. Perhaps the most important of these is publishing the thesaurus as Linked Open Data.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Big Big Data

September 12, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News

Researchers at the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Infection and Global Health are building the world’s most comprehensive database describing human and animal pathogens. This big data project will be used to prevent and tackle disease outbreaks around the globe. This interesting information came from Phys.org in their article, “Using ‘Big Data’ approach to map relationships between human and animal diseases.” The Enhanced Infectious Diseases (EID2) database has been developed by the Liverpool University Climate and Infectious Diseases of Animals (LUCINDA) team and is funded by a BBSRC Strategic Tools and Resources Development Fund grant.

EID2 is using openly accessible information in a new way and thereby tracing the history of human and animal diseases to predict the effects of climate change on pathogens. The project will be using these predictions to produce maps showing which diseases are most likely in particular areas and to categorize the complex relationships between human and animal carriers and hosts of numerous pathogens. The project has far-reaching possibilities. It will be interesting to watch as it develops and evolves.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

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