Censorship in Books

September 11, 2015  
Posted in News, reference

Since it is Friday and it has been a long week (five days of work crammed into four), this different yet interesting information seemed appropriate for today. Banned Books Week is the national book community’s annual celebration of the freedom to read. Hundreds of libraries and bookstores around the country draw attention to the problem of censorship by mounting displays of challenged books and hosting a variety of events. The 2015 celebration will be held September 27-October 3. Bustle brought this topic to us in their article, “When Is Banned Books Week 2015? The Celebration Kicks Off On September 27.

Since 1982, Banned Books Week has been an annual event in the U.S., propelled by schools, libraries, and bookstores in support of our freedoms of speech and information. According to the American Library Association, more than 11,000 books have been challenged in the 30-plus years since Banned Books Week began. This year’s focus will be on young adult literature, which ironically is the most challenged genre of books.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

The Future of Our Field

August 28, 2015  
Posted in News, reference

The Da Vinci Science Center in Allentown, Pennsylvania recently set a new participation record during its 2015 fiscal year. This interesting news came from The Morning Call in their article, “Da Vinci Science Center sets new record and other company news.”

The center’s total participation increased 3.4 percent from its 2014 fiscal year ending June 30, bringing science to life for a total of 127,720 people. This is exciting news as this national award-winning science center has connected science to life and lives to science since 1992. They foster the interests of future men and women who might consider science, technology, engineering and mathematical careers.

“The most important result of the Da Vinci Science Center’s performance during the 2015 fiscal year, as it is every year, is the impact the center makes on the young people in our area — the future scientists, engineers, innovators and leaders who will shape the development of the greater Lehigh Valley region for decades to come,” said Lin Erickson, executive director and CEO of the Da Vinci Science Center. “Throughout the year, we have been discussing visions for our future, and our ability to increase our impact and produce sustained success emboldens us as we look forward.”

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

The Alpha and Omega

July 9, 2015  
Posted in News, reference

The origins of words have long intrigued me. If you watched My Big Fat Greek Wedding, you already know that the origins of all words (at least to Gus Portokalos) began in Greek. This topic came from our favorite vocabulary nerd, the Word Lady, in her blog post, “All is well in my cosmos.”

Etymology (in Greek: etumon, defined as the true sense of a word) is the study of the history of words. Etymology analyzes the component parts of words by identifying their origins in other languages. The etymology of botanical terms rests in Greek and Latin word bases, sometimes called roots and stems (ba dum tish). Word bases are modified by prefixes in front, and suffixes behind.

Sometimes the problem with finding the origins, however, is that you discover that the pronunciation has morphed over the years to fit in with the vernacular of the day, or the particular usages.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Ontologist Needed

July 2, 2015  
Posted in News, reference

As we strive to be as helpful as possible to those in the fields of taxonomy, indexing, ontology, etc., we are excited to share career opportunities that we find with our readers. Even if you aren’t in the market for a career move, it is always good to stay on top of what is available and how the fields are evolving.

A leading insurance company in New York City is looking for an ontologist / architect to be responsible for developing, implementing, and managing a comprehensive taxonomy and ontology strategy for use in managing a business units or entire enterprises information assets. Learn more and apply here.

If you are looking to change positions, good luck on your search.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Urban Myths

June 24, 2015  
Posted in News, reference

It isn’t quite as bad as looking for a needle in a haystack, but close. The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) has launched a search to find the first recorded use in English of the word ‘numpty’, which means a foolish or stupid person. This odd but interesting information came from The Times of Oman in their article, “Oxford English Dictionary launches search for first recorded use of word ‘numpty’.”

Since the mid-1980s, ‘numpty’ has been used as a mild term of abuse in Britain. The researchers want to find out if Glaswegians really were the first to call people numpties, or if the term existed earlier in other parts of the United Kingdom.

Like me, you may ask why. A spokesman for the team said: “OED Appeals is a dedicated community space on the OED website where OED editors solicit help in unearthing new information about the history and usage of English. Part of the process of revising words and phrases for the OED involves searching for evidence of a word’s first recorded use in English, and for this we need your help.” Anyone who knows where ‘numpty’ began to be used is urged to contact the OED team, and pass on their knowledge of how it came to be.

My research reveals that some believe it to be the “most cringeworthy word in the entire English language right now” and seek to not have it added to the dictionary.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Taxonomist Positions Available

June 16, 2015  
Posted in News, reference, Taxonomy

To be as helpful as possible to those in the fields of taxonomy, indexing, ontology, etc., we are sharing career opportunities that we find with our readers. Even if you are not in the market for a career move, it is always good to stay on top of what is available and how the fields are evolving.

TE Connectivity is looking for a Manager, Digital Product Data Taxonomist at their Middletown, Pennsylvania location. In this position you will manage the work required to maintain their taxonomy, information architecture, content management, and knowledge management projects to maintain a customer-centric online catalog.

Amazon is looking for a Taxonomist & Browse Developer at their Seattle, Washington location. You will help build an intuitive and comprehensive navigation structure to optimize product discovery when searching and browsing on their sites.

If you are looking to change positions, good luck on your search.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Slang or Vintage?

May 28, 2015  
Posted in Folksonomy, News, reference

I am fascinated by words. Their meaning, their history, their multiple uses – all of this and more draws me to dig deeper in vocabulary. I am a “word of the day” kind of gal. One interesting and slightly humorous find came from NPR in their article, “Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms.”

The regional ways of saying particular things — sometimes in very particular ways — are one of my favorite things about vocabulary. Do you say couch or davenport? Soda or pop? Grandpa or Granddad?

Many wonder if the English language has become homogenized, and if the unique colloquialisms are being faded out in favor of more inclusive or generic language.

I look at the list of regional slangs or terms that are supposedly disappearing and see too many that I know. Hall tree is no longer used? But why?

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Working Together for Open Access

May 27, 2015  
Posted in News, reference

Springer has announced a partnership with IMISCOE, the largest network of excellence on migration and diversity in the world. This partnership will allow for the publication of their open access journal Comparative Migration Studies and their book series IMISCOE Research Series. Springer shared this news in their release titled, “Springer partners with IMISCOE on open access journal and book series on migration.

Comparative Migration Studies is an international, peer-reviewed open access journal that provides a platform for articles that focus on comparative research in migration, integration, and ethnic studies.

Springer will also publish the IMISCOE Research Series, the official book series of IMISCOE. Most titles in the series will be published open access and be available through SpringerOpen as well as on SpringerLink.

This type of collaboration and support for open access is inspiring and sets a good precedent for future endeavors to be open to all.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Providing Access to Those Who Need It Most

May 21, 2015  
Posted in News, reference

INASP is a registered UK charity that works to support global research communication through innovation, networking and capacity strengthening, focusing on the needs of developing and emerging countries. They work with publishers to enable affordable and sustainable access to online resources to developing countries and with national library consortia or equivalent to help them meet the information needs of researchers. This interesting information came to us from Information Today Europe in their article, “INASP: publishers must engage responsibly with developing-world libraries.”

Affordable access to research is still a major challenge. INASP works with library consortia or other national bodies to ensure that researchers and students have the journals and books they need. I, for one, am inspired by the efforts to strengthen research and higher education systems across Africa, Asia and Latin America. 

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

The Darker Side of Words

May 20, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, reference

I am a word person. I think you know that about me already. I like origins of words, different meanings, and especially the emotions that are tied with particular words. Some interesting information along those lines recently came from Quartz in their article, “Dictionary.com’s newest words reveal our fascination with the internet’s dark side.

Dictionary.com recently announced the newest words to be added to its annals. Changes and additions to the digital dictionary are made through a multi-layered process that takes into account each new term’s newsworthiness, frequency of use, and related online searches.

The latest additions seem to reveal a growing apprehension of dangers lurking. For example, 

  • blackhat: a hacker who violates the security of a system for personal profit or for the gratification of causing damage.
  • cybercrime: criminal activity or a crime that involves the Internet, a computer system, or computer technology.
  • dark web: the portion of the Internet that is intentionally hidden from search engines, uses masked IP addresses, and is accessible only with a special web browser.
  • dox: to publish the private personal information of another person without their consent.

Then there are those that identify social characteristics, such as slacktivism: actions taken to bring about political or social change but requiring only minimal commitment, effort, or risk.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

« Previous PageNext Page »