The Meaning Matters

March 25, 2014  
Posted in News, semantic

Semantic technology has dramatically changed search in recent years. Consumers increasingly expect search engines to understand natural language and perceive the intent behind the words they include in their queries. How does this evolution affect you? Wired magazine brought us this information in their article, “Search Today and Beyond: Optimizing for the Semantic Web.”

The word “semantic” refers to meaning. Semantic search uses machine intelligence to determine the intended meaning of words so searches become more relevant. Without even knowing it, consumers are using more natural speech in their search queries. The focus is less on keywords and more on intent.

Semantic technology continues to grow and expand its uses. Access Innovations, developer of the M.A.I. machine-assisted indexing system, specializes in complex coding, tagging, and indexing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Semantic Search Enhances Results

March 24, 2014  
Posted in News, search, semantic

Vodacom SA has deployed Ontology Systems to enhance their service assurance operations. By providing Vodacom with a comprehensive service assurance solution for change management and fault management operations, they can accurately assess the impact of change requests and reduce the cross-network impact of ad hoc transmission infrastructure fault management. IT News Online brought this news to us in their article, “Vodacom Deploys Ontology for Advanced Service Impact Analysis.”

Ontology Systems’ CEO and founder, Benedict Enweani, offered words of affirmation: “We appreciate Vodacom’s confidence in choosing Ontology and are delighted, that together, the joint project team have delivered a strategic SIA solution, on-time and under-budget. Achieving an accurate, near real-time view of a transmission network data is a significant challenge for mobile operators. Ontology’s semantic search capability is ideally suited for finding and mapping the network and service dependencies hidden in an operator’s application data. This is a clear example of how search technologies are lowering the risks, cost and time normally associated with complex data integrations.”

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Intent in Search

March 21, 2014  
Posted in News, search, semantic

By analogy with the evolution of aviation, search technology and semantic technology have reached the equivalent of the  stealth bombers. Boolean expressions made searches more sophisticated through the use of query modifiers. It became possible to find better results by narrowing or widening the parameters. Keyword searches match results to phrases that are specified by users, and advanced algorithms made this the dominant approach for Web search engines by assigning rankings to pages with the best user experience. But what about context? This interesting topic came from Search Engine Journal in their article, “The Stealthy Rise of Semantic Search.”

Semantic search uses machine intelligence to determine the intended meaning of words so searches become more relevant. This didn’t happen overnight. Semantic search is a much more comprehensive and powerful technology that can return exact results based on the context, content, and user intent. Consumers benefit in this new world of search.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Paving the Way for Better Banking

March 19, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News, semantic

One scientist sees the technology of semantics as a solution to better understand and manage big-bank risk profiles. Using the compilation of data achievable by the semantic models, banking professionals will be able to better prepare for regulatory issues and internal risk calculations. American Banker brought this topic to our attention in their article, “Semantics: The Next Big Issue in Big Data.” Few would disagree that better banking is needed.

Semantic technology requires a special knowledge of terminology and coding to reduce errors. Access Innovations, developer of the M.A.I. machine-assisted indexing system and specializing in complex coding, tagging, and indexing, provides a range of services that deliver tag integrity.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Looking Forward

March 18, 2014  
Posted in News, semantic

The semantic web has been referred to as the next phase of the Internet. What this means is not agreed upon at this point, but it is safe to say that it will impact all humans as well as how they communicate with one another. Data has changed as well, and that is partly due to the semantic web.

Artificial intelligence that will match human intelligence will allow us to ask questions and find answers more easily by simply asking natural language questions to computers. This goes far beyond an everyday application such as Siri.

This interesting topic was inspired by Smart Data Collective in their article, “How Will the Future of Big Data Impact the Way We Work and Live?”

This advanced technology also changes the job market and futures of current students. The class of 2013 has different options than the class of 2010, and the class of 2016 will realize even more opportunities because of the current work in artificial intelligence.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Sharing the Semantics

March 17, 2014  
Posted in News, semantic

Sprylogics International has signed an agreement with Keek to explore sharing technology and expertise around a broad segment of cross-platform opportunities. This includes the deployment of Sprylogics’ semantic processing engine into Keek’s mobile platform. The Wall Street Journal brought this interesting news to our attention in their article, “Sprylogics and Keek Enter Into Strategic Agreement to Collaborate on Cross-Platform Technology,” Sprylogics will be providing semantic content analysis to Keek.

“I’m very excited about what we can accomplish via this strategic relationship with Keek”, says Marvin Igelman”, CEO of Sprylogics. “This represents one of the broadest technology and business development partnership we have ever cemented, as it covers access to our SDK platform, API access, consulting expertise, as well as our core semantic analysis infrastructure.”

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

 

Better is Better, Right?

March 14, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News, semantic

A research collaboration is underway between the information and communications technology giant Fujitsu and the Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI) at NUI Galway. It could very well change the way we look at linked data. Silicon Republic brought this news to us in their article, “Semantic web breakthrough could make sense of big data faster.”

There is potential for researchers and organizations to unlock open data sets of massive numbers and merge them with their own data. This will enable them to gain new insights into everything from financial information to healthcare breakthroughs.

The current challenge is that the data sets are located in various places and not together. This semantic web breakthrough could make sense of big data faster and better, which could only be a good thing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Making Content Findable

March 13, 2014  
Posted in News, search, semantic

Search tools are a researcher’s best technological tool to help them analyze, evaluate, and discover, since making content findable is key to progress. Semantic search takes those results to a new level. This interesting information was found on Fort Mill Times in their article, “Scale Capital Funds Unsilo, Democratizing Access to Scientific Research.”

Semantic search engine Unsilo seeks to break down knowledge barriers across industries and scientific domains. Making data available from a variety of industries and knowledge bases is much like being a kid in a candy shop for researchers.

Semantic technology requires a special knowledge of terminology and coding to reduce errors. Access Innovations, developer of the M.A.I. machine-assisted indexing system and specializing in complex coding, tagging, and indexing, provides a range of services that deliver tag integrity.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Semantics and Search

March 12, 2014  
Posted in News, search, semantic

Expert System recently announced that ANSA has chosen the Cogito semantic technology to improve access in its ANSAFoto image database. The worlds of news and publishing have both grown more and more dependent on technologies that enable filtering to access only the content you are looking for, along with real-time sharing, both quickly and easily.

In response, the ANSA press agency has implemented what it describes as the first image search engine that uses semantic technology for analysis of captions in English and Italian. Users may browse the agency’s collection of millions of photographs using advanced search capabilities that are more intuitive, and with an approach that mirrors the way that users speak and think.

Market Wired brought this exciting news to our attention in their article, “Press Agency ANSA chooses Expert System Semantic Search for ANSAFoto Image Archive.” Expert System’s semantic technology enables automatic processing for text accompanying ANSA photos, and categorizes them according to a predefined taxonomy.

Semantic technology continues to grow and expand its uses. Access Innovations, developer of the M.A.I. machine-assisted indexing system, specializes in complex coding, tagging, and indexing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Semantic Fingerprinting for Name Disambiguation

fingerprint

 

 

 

 

 

Many institutions and organizations – notably (but not limited to) publishers – have large, or sometimes very very large, lists of names. These names are from member directories, employees and staff, clients and customers, marketing, development, and many other sources; indeed, oftentimes the lists from various departments in the same organization are not connected or resolved with one another in any way.

This growing problem has given rise to a sub-field in the information/data industry variously called “named entity disambiguation” or “author disambiguation” or “name disambiguation”, among other monikers. In the academic publishing space, disambiguation of author names is a common challenge.

In a nutshell, given a list of names—let’s say, oh, 3.2 million names—to determine which ones are the same person and which are not, we might proceed as follows:

names3

 

 

 

 

 

The goal is, as automatically as possible, to sort out which of these records should be merged. Once accomplished, you (a publisher) could make a webpage for each author listing all publications and so forth for your users to browse.

Clearly, some of the names above are potentially the same person, while others are not. For example B. Caldwell Smith, B.C. Smith, and Brandon C. Smith, and Brandon Caldwell Smith look like they might be the same person. To find out without looking at every name and every article (3.2 million, remember?) we need more information.

To accomplish this task, metadata associated with each author is examined and compared to try to eliminate duplicates. For example, from each article we can associate an author with his co-authors, the institution with which she was involved when the paper was published, email addresses, dates of publication, and so forth.

names4

 

 

 

 

Well, some things are clearer, but some are not. Whereas before we may have suspected that Rodger Smith and Roger Smith were different people, they published at the same institution in the same year; maybe it’s just a typo? And maybe Brandon C. Caldwell moved from Harvard to Yale (not unheard of) sometime between 1961 and 1972?

At Access Innovations we’ve been developing a way to add some certainty to the process using semantic metadata—it’s not a silver bullet, but it is a bigger gun. We call the process “semantic fingerprinting” and it’s based on our thesaurus and indexing technology.

Every author’s works (papers, conference proceedings, editorial roles) associates them with one or more pieces of content, and for each piece of content we have indexing terms from a thesaurus particular to that client. By associating the author directly with the indexing terms, we develop a semantic profile (or “fingerprint”) for each one. Since each author usually authors multiple papers (see “Lotka’s Law”), we compile the subject terms from each paper to make a more complete profile; obviously the more papers we have, the more accurate these profiles are.

Returning to our example:

names5

 

 

 

 

 

What we suspected to be perhaps one person based on our best information turns out pretty obviously to be two distinct researchers once the areas of expertise are added to the equation.

While the process is far from foolproof, it does help to automate the disambiguation process, which cuts down on the number of human hours required to review the work.

The concept of the “semantic fingerprint” can be applied to a paper, a school, an editor, or any other entity for which subject metadata is available. So this same basic process can be used for other purposes; for example, to:

  • Disambiguate institution names
  • Match articles to peer reviewers or editors
  • Demonstrate what areas of research are exploding at,
    • A journal
    • A college
    • A research laboratory

As datasets get cleaner and cleaner the accuracy of, and uses for, semantic technologies—such as Access Innovations’ Semantic Fingerprinting techniques—will continue to increase.

Bob Kasenchak, Project Coordinator
Access Innovations

Semantic Fingerprinting image © Access Innovations, Inc.

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