Accessing the Clouds

May 12, 2015  
Posted in News, storage

The cloud has become a daily part of our nomenclature. It is the infinite storage location, easy to access archive, and secure hideaway of data. With this kind of prominence comes competition. KMWorld brought this news to our attention in their article, “Records management in the cloud: a multidimensional issue.

Competition among cloud storage providers for customers is intense, but what happens when a file in the cloud needs to be classified and managed as a record, not just something you dust off once in awhile?

Different models for cloud storage create different scenarios for records management. One option is for a hosted cloud solution, in which case the content and the records management function are both in the cloud.

It is important to make your data smarter, not just bigger because there seems to be unlimited storage space. Semantic technology continues to grow and expand its uses. Managing data is just one of those. Access Innovations, developer of the M.A.I. machine-assisted indexing system, specializes in complex coding, tagging, and indexing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Choosing Storage Carefully

May 6, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, storage

Cloud storage is fast becoming the desired solution driving users’ decisions. It seems like the perfect answer to a complicated space issue. However, there are some factors around cloud storage that would behoove anyone considering it to remember. This interesting information came to us from Net Security in their article, “Five misunderstandings about cloud storage.

First, let’s talk about management and access. If users create their own access, they may use personal information to set up an account. This limits the organization’s access to any of the company data the user has stored.

A second problem involves institutional knowledge and employee terminations. When a user exits the company, a plan is needed for the cloud account and the data. This isn’t much far from the first point, but one often overlooked.

Check out the complete article for further information that can help you in this process.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Custom Storage Increases Findability

April 29, 2015  
Posted in News, search, storage

21st Century Technologies Limited has developed an indigenous records and information management solution that offers companies secure, innovative, and customized document storage and management. This Day Live brought this interesting information to our attention in their article, “21st Century Technologies Introduces Document Management Solutions.”

The customized solutions have been described as the answer to document storage, file storage, and document management services, and are designed to tackle the painful areas that most organizations face in data storage and access.

Access to data is important. It can be achieved by creating strong taxonomies. Proper indexing against a strong standards-based taxonomy increases the findability of data. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Managing the Email Chaos

March 27, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, storage

There is much chatter about email since the latest Washington brouhaha involving Hillary Clinton’s use of private email at the State Department. Of course, this comes on the coattails of Lois Lerner’s missing emails at the IRS last year and puts extra pressure on the upcoming deadlines for the implementation of electronic email recordkeeping from the Office of Management and Budget. This interesting topic came from GCN in their article, “A practical approach to email records management.”

The Federal Records Act (FRA) and National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) regulations  require that government employees treat email messages created or received in the course of official business as federal records and manage them accordingly.

Even in civilian organizations, managing email data and storage is a challenge. We know that email isn’t going anywhere, at least anytime soon. So the key is to create a document storage strategy that will enable discovery easily and with comprehensive results. Taxonomies can help with this.

How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Capturing the data is only part of the project. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Sharing the Knowledge

March 27, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, storage

Information professionals are often the last people brought onto projects involving digital asset management (DAM) teams and other project teams. Why is this? They bring a perspective that connects everyone’s interest and investment in the final outcome. They can remove themselves from the territory problems and turf wars by asking the important and simple questions, like “What are you trying to do?” CMS Wire brought this news to our attention in their article, “Library Science, Not Library Silence.”

Information professionals bring power and knowledge to the table. For example, let’s look at the taxonomy. Who else will know where to start? Their perspective is informed, educated, and skilled. And that is just the beginning. Don’t overlook the experts on any project.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Keeping Your Personal Information Secure

March 24, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, storage

Australians fear that their government isn’t capable of handling their personal information, despite a new law not yet implemented that is intended to stop terrorism. This interesting news came from the Financial Review in their article,”Poll shows Australians not sold on data retention.”

The government has that said the increased powers are necessary tools in the battle against terrorism and crimes being organized online. Based on a recent survey, Australians do not agree and do not trust their personal data in the government’s hands.

The survey sought to test how well Australians understand the stated scope of the legislation, as well as to gauge views on the broader implications of the government’s new powers.

Data security is important. So is access to data. It can be achieved by creating strong taxonomies. Proper indexing against a strong standards-based taxonomy increases the findability of data. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Smart Storage

March 20, 2015  
Posted in News, storage

If your data is growing like everyone else’s, you are having a space issue. Maybe it is time to look to the clouds for unlimited space and other benefits. This interesting thought was found on Cloud Tweaks in their article, “The New Wave On The Cloud: Object Based Storage.”

Storage technology has progressed to handle object-based storage better than ever before. Object-based storage is beneficial for large companies, but this innovative technology is now being made available to small to mid-size companies trying to cope with growing data needs.

When it comes to storage, access to data is important. It can be achieved by creating strong taxonomies. Proper indexing against a strong standards-based taxonomy increases the findability of data. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Handling the Email Chaos

January 21, 2015  
Posted in News, storage, Taxonomy

The voices, or maybe the rants, differ on the advantages of email for records management. We understand the storage challenges that come with the mass amounts of data created by email. In discovery alone, email poses challenges to even the strongest records management policies. This interesting topic was brought to us by the article, “Document management in the age of email,” from Fierce Content Management.

A recent survey from Pew Internet revealed that 61 percent of working Internet users who responded consider email to be “very important” to their jobs. It is important to note that this same kind of majority held in traditionally ‘white collar,’ office-based occupations. For those who take their jobs outside of the physical boundaries of the workplace at least occasionally, it was also deemed very important.

We know that email isn’t going anywhere, at least anytime soon. So the key is to create a document storage strategy that will enable discovery easily and with comprehensive results. Taxonomies can help with this.

How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Capturing the data is only part of the project. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Packrats Unite

January 13, 2015  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, storage, Taxonomy

Here we are at the beginning of a new year. Resolutions aside, it is great time to take inventory of your records and evaluate your records management plan. This suggestion came to us from the Green Bay Gazette in their article, “Purging the paper from your office — and your life.”

I confess. I am a packrat, hoarder, collector, or whatever you want to call it. I inherited it honestly from my mother and grandmother. When it comes to work, I call myself “IT’s nightmare and Legal’s dream”. I save every digital file and email. I use more than my share in storage, but when the general counsel comes over looking for “that thing we did a couple of years ago about the you know and the other things” – I have it and it is found with minimal effort.

I don’t pretend to set myself up as the perfect example of indexing and findability – not by a long shot. First of all, I am not a walking taxonomy. And we all know that the true way to achieve findability is through a strong taxonomy to index metadata against for future searches.

Knowing what to keep and what to throw away is a decision based on a number of factors, and those will differ from one organization to another.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Data Everywhere

October 17, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News, storage

Data in every form, including digital and print, is growing at an exponential rate. According to the National Science Foundation, 90 percent of the data in existence today was created in the last two years. This interesting information was found on Federal News Radio in their article, “Data retention & records management.” The Presidential Directive on Managing Government Records, and initiatives such as the Open Data Policy, have begun to address this critical situation, but this is only the beginning.

In 2012, the Presidential Directive on Managing Government Records was issued. This is an unfunded mandate that targets 2019 as the year that federal agencies need to complete their transition to digital records. Some believe that the federal government has reached a critical tipping point in terms of records and information management. What options do the agencies have to position themselves for better management, governance, information access and transparency?

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

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