Recovering Data with Findability

November 26, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, search, Taxonomy

In our house, when we are seeking answers or can’t remember something, we say – “to the Googles”. We often ponder what we did prior to the existence of the Internet search engine. Long forgotten movies and childhood memories would stay forgotten, I presume. These thoughts were inspired by from the blog, Scholarly Open Access and their article, “Google Scholar is Filled with Junk Science.”

Google Scholar works well for known-item searches, for example, when you quickly need to locate a known article or a paper by a known author. However, when you’re looking for more specifics, it lacks the ability to hone in because it doesn’t use controlled vocabularies like taxonomies and thesauri.

Information being findable is the result of good indexing and comprehensive metatagging. Automated indexing is a comprehensive approach to making content findable. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies with integrated indexing rule bases to make their information findable.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Additional Active Searching Techniques for Taxonomy Resources

November 24, 2014  
Posted in Access Insights, Featured, Taxonomy

To continue our theme from last time: “For every minute spent in organizing, an hour is earned” (Unknown).

This quotation helps us remember the importance of developing online search techniques that will help you “save” time (or, at least allocate your time wisely!). Previously, we looked at keyword searching on the open web and in full-text search environments. Today, let’s consider another active search technique. This one takes advantage of online website directories.

There are a few free, quality, online directories. “Quality” and “free” are not mutually exclusive terms. Current and curated directories are useful for bringing in specific and targeted user traffic. Unlike a keyword search, directories allow the searcher to browse general subjects until he or she is ready to drill down to a very specific classification, category, or topic. Finding a “good” directory is not entirely subjective. Objectively, “good” directories are governed by the goal to offer only trustworthy and timely listings. The listings in a quality directory have been pre-evaluated, or vetted, by a human curator or editor.

It is necessary to think categorically when looking for taxonomy, thesaurus, or ontology resources. When it comes to “taxonomy management” or “thesaurus management,” you will want to first look at the top level terms and categories of the directory. In searches for taxonomy resources within a directory, the following pattern is observable at both http://www.dmoz.org/ and www.bestoftheweb.com.

webdir

At both of these directory locations, drill down by clicking the “reference” path. Underneath “reference”, look for “knowledge management.” Since taxonomies assist in “knowledge discovery” (as in navigation), the searcher might discover something of use there. Otherwise, “knowledge representation” or “knowledge retrieval” may be the searcher’s next tab(s) of choice. “Classification” is sometimes a useful subcategory to explore, also. Although “classification” may refer to a physical location (as in book item or number), it sometimes overlaps with the ordering of terms that describe concepts of information resources. For example, as you scroll down the 29 entries at http://www.dmoz.org/Reference/Libraries/Library_and_Information_Science/Technical_Services/Cataloguing/Classification/ you’ll notice some taxonomy entries near the bottom of the alphabetized list (see the red underlining in the screenshot below).

class2

Interestingly, each directory has its own categories and may take a variety of approaches and strategies to hit your target (if the directory even contains your target!).

Another directory you might try is http://dir.yahoo.com/ But notice the different sequence and thought process in order to find your resource(s). Here is the search string, or permutation, in order to arrive at “Knowledge Management.”

Directory > Business and Economy > Business to Business > Management > Knowledge Management

Earlier on in the string, the searcher could have also detoured after Directory > Business and Economy > Business to Business > Information > and also found pertinent resources for information or knowledge. So, in this case, your primary directory top term was not reference but business and economy.

You might also consider some of the following directory resources; http://www.refdesk.com/toc.html. As you scroll down the page, look for “Refdesk Subject Categories” located in the final portion of the middle column.

refdesk

The Internet public library offers both a search window and a subject directory. See http://www.ipl.org/div/subject/ or http://www.ipl.org/div/about/sitemap.html 

The WWW Virtual Library can be found at http://vlib.org/. Click on Information and Libraries to yield the following categories of interest for knowledge and information management:
112414

lts is http://www.e-journals.org/ A simple search of taxonomy management yielded 244 results. Try some variations like business taxonomy for additional results.

doa

 

Another resource to try is http://www.exactseek.com/

adfgasa

The serendipity that results from browsing often yields better results than keyword searching. For example, notice the rich resources located at http://www.brint.com/km/

aerhzmm

At the same site, you’ll find various portals down the rightmost column at http://www.brint.com/km/#definition

supply

 

Toying slightly with different search term combinations will provide various results that are still within your desired search parameters. For example, try searching business taxonomy or project taxonomy or operative taxonomy. Other resources to explore include http://www.best-web-directories.com/free-directories.htm and http://www.controlledvocabulary.com/links.html.

[Although several paid directories exist, they are outside the scope of this blog.]

Next time we’ll consider some passive search strategies in order to find taxonomy, thesaurus, or ontology resources.

Eric Ziecker, Information Consultant
Access Innovations

 

 

Using Taxonomies to Increase Findability

November 21, 2014  
Posted in News, search, Taxonomy

If you aren’t cold enough where you are, check out this conference coming up. Maybe you can visit Boston in December? The Gilbane Conference is all about helping organizations apply content, web, mobile, and marketing technologies to increase engagement by improving the digital experiences of their customers, employees, and partners. This conference takes place December 2-4 and offers a variety of sessions, including one that covers the use of taxonomies to increase findability.

It is key to understand what technologies can and can’t do. Companies need to be agile and able to incorporate an indeterminate number of digital and physical channels with different form factors and capabilities, and they need to do so in ways that protect and enhance their brand. This conference will address just that, and more.

To achieve quality taxonomies that enable findability, it has never been more important to approach knowledge organization based on accepted and shared standards. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies that can help you generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

The Value of the Process

November 21, 2014  
Posted in News, ontology, Taxonomy

SemantiCz™ v2.0 has been released, with new features that help generate relationships with precise, subject-specific contextual accuracy. Users will be able to manage multiple versions of domain-specific ontologies and vocabularies in various languages, as well as extract relationships from content using advanced text mining algorithms. This interesting information came from ThomasNet in their article, “Content Enrichment Solution delivers contextual accuracy.”

Ontologies in semantic enrichment can bring better enrichment of domain-intensive content. By using subject matter experts (SMEs) who are experienced in curating the triples extracted by the platform, SemantiCz users will be able to handle a wide range of subject domains based on its proprietary engine and Scope’s experience in building taxonomies.

It is important to remember the value of a solid taxonomy and its role in the search process. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations has extensive experience in constructing taxonomies for academic publishers, and can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Word of Another Kind

November 21, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

If you are like me, words intrigue and inspire you. I could be called a thesaurus nerd, reading and researching words synonymous with one another to add impact to my writing and tell my stories with more emotion, detail, and energy. This topic was inspired by the article, “A thesaurus by any other name is still a thesaurus,” from the Powdersville Post.

The fact that a word is almost similar or almost synonymous to another word doesn’t always mean that it will work well as a non-preferred term in a structured thesaurus or taxonomy. However, developing a classification system organized into conceptually similar categories can help users gain a better understanding of the taxonomy subject area. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data.

Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI-compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Age Symbolizes Wisdom

November 18, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, Taxonomy

Archiving, indexing, and making content findable are at the core of what we do. Many of our clients include scholars who devote more than a fair share of their time to older literature. The Scholarly Kitchen brought this news to our attention in their article, “Growing Impact of Older Articles.” Older articles are being defined as 10 years old or older. I won’t take offense to that.

Recently, some Google employees analyzed the paper, “On the Shoulders of Giants: The Growing Impact of Older Articles,” by Alex Verstak and found the age of citations was from 1990 to 2013. They report that scholars are citing proportionally more of the older literature. Most professionals would accept these findings as good news, considering the 24 hour news cycle these days and the slant towards the negative.

Quality taxonomies enable findability. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies that can help you generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Identifying New Life

November 14, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

After all these years, decades, and centuries of scientific investigation, new living organisms are still being discovered and identified. The hope that new life brings as other animal species are becoming extinct brings hope. At least twelve new species of butterflies/moths have been identified recently.

This may not be the normal news story we report on daily, but it certainly falls into the world and art of taxonomies. We found this news on Butterflies and Moths of North America. Taxonomy is the science of classification, and in this case, of organisms in an ordered system that indicates natural relationships.

To achieve quality taxonomies that enable findability, it has never been more important to approach knowledge organization based on accepted and shared standards. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies that can help you generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Hands-on Learners Unite

November 13, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

Some people learn better when they are hands-on with a project. If that is the case for you, then this interesting and humorous exercise from The Biology Corner just might interest you. Projected into year 2525, it takes you through the projected and hypothetical plants and organisms that could exist after 500 years of evolution. The Taxonomy Project asks you to classify these organisms. This just might be an attempt to teach the principles of biological taxonomy from a different perspective. Or it might just be a diversion exercise. Either way, it is interesting.

Developing a taxonomy or classification system organized into conceptually similar categories can help users gain a better understanding of the taxonomy subject area. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. If you are looking for a assistance, you should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Check It Out

November 11, 2014  
Posted in Access Insights, News, Taxonomy

The first volume in a series about creating and maintaining taxonomies is now available. “The Taxobook: History, Theories, and Concepts of Knowledge Organization” is written by our own Margie Hlava.

In this first book of the series, the author introduces the very foundations of classification, starting with the ancient Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle, as well as Theophrastus and the Roman Pliny the Elder. Much like the work done at Access Innovations, a good foundation is needed for making content findable.

Following the discussions and historical review, the author has included a glossary that covers all three books of this series so that it can be referenced as you work your way through the second and third volumes. The author believes that it is important to understand the history of knowledge organization and the differing viewpoints of various philosophers—even if that understanding is simply that the differing viewpoints exist.These differing viewpoints will help answer the fundamental questions: Why do we want to build taxonomies? How do we build them to serve multiple points of view?

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Systematics Conference Offered

November 11, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

The Systematics Association is hosting a Young Systematists’ Forum 2014 in London, UK on November 21, 2014.  Being committed to furthering all aspects of systematic biology, the Systematics Association is organizing a program of international conferences on key themes in systematics, including a series of major biennial conferences. The association also supports a variety of training courses in systematics and awards grants in support of systematics research.

As is normal for most professional organizations, membership is open to amateurs and professionals with interests in any branch of biology, including microbiology and palaeontology. Members are generally entitled to attend the conferences at a reduced registration rate, to apply for grants from the Association and to receive Newsletters and mailings of information.

The Systematics Association was founded in May 1937 as the “Committee on Systematics in Relation to General Biology” to provide a forum for the discussion of the general theoretical and practical problems of taxonomy. Since then the Association has pioneered discussion on many new developments in systematics and more than 50 special volumes have been published.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

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