Making SharePoint Work For You

September 18, 2014  
Posted in News, search, Taxonomy

Learn how to get SharePoint ECM just right in a one-hour complimentary webinar on the six critical success factors for managing your SharePoint ECM program. This webinar is brought to you by Earley & Associates, experts on making information more findable, useable,
and valuable.

This webinar would be beneficial to you if you have management responsibility for deploying SharePoint as an ECM. Hear from Seth Earley, CEO of Earley & Associates, and Gary Kahn, Vice-President for Search and Findability Solutions talk about six critical success factors that can make or break a SharePoint ECM initiative. You can register here for the September 25, 2014 webinar at 1:00 p.m. EDT.

SharePoint users can take full advantage of their metadata through auto-classification, enterprise taxonomy management, entity extraction, and search enhancements. Access Innovations’ Data Harmony suite of content enrichment and thesaurus management tools can be fully integrated with Microsoft SharePoint.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

New Financial Taxonomy Available for Review

September 16, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) recently released the proposed 2015 GAAP Financial Reporting Taxonomy for public review and comment. The deadline to submit written comments is October 31, 2014. The taxonomy is a list of computer-readable financial reporting labels coded in eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL), an open-source computer language that allows companies to tag the financial data. The tags allow users of financial statements to electronically search for, assemble, and process data. Business Wire brought this news to us in their article, “2015 GAAP Financial Reporting Taxonomy Available for Public Review and Comment.”

The proposed 2015 GAAP Financial Reporting Taxonomy contains updates for accounting standards and other recommended improvements to the official taxonomy. The 60-day comment period is intended to allow users of the taxonomy to provide feedback on these updates.

The most cumbersome part of generating accurate XBRL documents is the searching of correct concept definitions. Tagging the financial data will improve the search feature and thus the findability of data.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

TopQuadrant Releases V4.5

September 9, 2014  
Posted in News, search, Taxonomy

TopQuadrant has released Version 4.5 of TopBraid Suite, which is designed to simplify the development and management of standards-based, model-driven solutions for enterprise taxonomy and ontology management. This interesting news came from KM World in their article, “Semantic data integration from TopQuadrant.”

Version 4.5 includes enhancements to TopBraid Enterprise Vocabulary Network (TB-EVN), TopBraid Insight (TBI) and the TopBraid Platform.

New features of TopBraid EVN 4.5 include enhanced audit trails (changes resulting from import of files and comments are captured immediately upon saving) and improved search form. Searches on cardinalities, regular expressions, aggregates in the search counts, and charting of results are now enabled.

These features and others will help users who need to collaborate on defining and linking enterprise vocabularies, taxonomies, and metadata used for information sharing, data integration, and search.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

The Taxonomy of New Life

September 8, 2014  
Posted in News, Standards, Taxonomy

After all these years, decades, and centuries of scientific investigation, new (to scientists) living organisms are still being identified. The hope that new life brings as other animal species are becoming extinct reassures us that it is, after all, an evolution. At least twelve new species of butterflies/moths have been identified just this month.

This may not be the normal news story we report on daily, but it certainly falls into the world and art of taxonomies. We found this news on Butterflies and Moths of North America. Taxonomy is the science of classification, and in this case, of organisms in an ordered system that indicates natural relationships.

To achieve quality taxonomies that enable findability, it has never been more important to approach knowledge organization based on accepted and shared standards. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies that can help you generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

New Information Source Launched

September 5, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

SharePoint Reviews and IT Unity have joined forces to share the most up-to-date information about what’s going on in the SharePoint and Office 365 communities. IT Unity Communiqué has been launched. With this new newsletter, you will learn about the latest innovations and solutions with content from trusted and expert voices in the community.

To celebrate the launch, they are hosting a free webinar on September 10th, titled Gold Medal Collaboration: SharePoint Engagement at NBC
Olympics. Learn more and register today.

SharePoint users can take full advantage of their metadata through auto-classification, enterprise taxonomy management, entity extraction, and search enhancements. Access Innovations’ Data Harmony suite of content enrichment and thesaurus management tools can be fully integrated with Microsoft SharePoint.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Taxonomy of Artistic Value

September 4, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

Whether you prefer him as Dirty Harry, Josey Wales, or silent behind the camera powerfully directing Hilary Swank and Gene Hackman, Clint Eastwood is a taxonomy unto himself. And he has inspired proof that one can take a unique approach to categorizing things, depending on what is your purpose. Actor, director or both, this interesting and entertaining take on taxonomy was brought to us by The Wire in their article, “The Clint Eastwood Taxonomy: What Are His Best Films as a Director?”

It is important to remember the value of a solid taxonomy and its role in the search process. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations has extensive experience in constructing taxonomies for academic publishers, and can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Bringing Order to Browsing

September 2, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, Taxonomy

When I discovered this, I admit, I was excited and overwhelmed simultaneously. I love books. I love reading. My stack of “plan to reads” are quickly becoming taller than myself. But I confess, sometimes I get overwhelmed in a book store and then browsing online…oy!

Scribd is offering a different approach for browsing books online, and I can’t wait to try it out. They have combined the personal side of book recommendations with the power of technology. Combine that with over 1,800 categories meticulously indexed and, well, the possibilities are endless measured with a little order to keep the rest of us calm.

Any records management system requires a system of indexing to create findability. This online browsing site is records management. We know that indexing against a strong, standards-based taxonomy can ensure comprehensive search results. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ISO/ANSI/NISO compliant taxonomies to produce comprehensive results.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Hello Who?

September 2, 2014  
Posted in indexing, News, Taxonomy

The news that rocked the world this past week was not one from the Russia and Ukraine battlefields, nor was it from the promised and much needed peace agreement in the Gaza occupation and conflict. It was, in fact, the realization that a brand that has been around for over 40 years has been misrepresented and misunderstood by generations. The wide (however one-dimensional) eyed, pink bow adorned cartoon character stamped on practically every kind of product from backpacks to toasters is not the feline its name led us to believe. Hello Kitty is a third grade little girl from London.

We found this disturbing news in the Washington Post article, “Hello Kitty is not a cat. Everything is a lie.” This revelation comes from the manufacturer, Sanrio, who seemed surprised that we didn’t already know that. The lesson here might be to check the facts before you categorize. Don’t go on superficial resemblances. Don’t assume just because something looks like it has whiskers, it isn’t human. The obvious may not be that obvious. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Taxonomies Build Paths

September 2, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

EBSCO Information Service and Infotrieve have joined efforts to combine their search, content access, rights management and document delivery in a single platform. This new information came to us from KM World in their article, “EBSCO and Infotrieve Partner.”

Customers will be able to use Infotrieve’s Mobile Library as their e-content access and management platform while using the search and extensive metadata from EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS).

It is important to remember the value of a solid taxonomy and its role in the search process. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Taxonomy in the Pipeline, Part 3: Positive Feedback Loops

September 1, 2014  
Posted in Access Insights, Featured, Taxonomy

In her 1996 paper, The Rage to Master: The Decisive Role of Talent in the Visual Arts, Ellen Winner presents a concept she calls, well, the “rage to master.” The idea is that intellectually gifted children have a natural inclination to focus on a subject and immerse themselves in it until they reach mastery.

With proper support, the “rage to master” creates a positive feedback loop. Their interest combines with their gifts, enabling him or her to more easily grasp a topic than a more average individual. This provides a feeling of satisfaction, reinforcement that encourages the child to continue mining the subject. Using the initial knowledge as a springboard, the cycle repeats itself, creating an outward-spreading spiral of knowledge.

Data Harmony has something in common with that gifted child: the feedback loop in its indexing. The software knows nothing at first, but when it is fed content, its subject of choice, and is given support and encouragement in the form of taxonomy building and editorial analysis, it can start the learning process.

With one piece of content, it can only learn so much. It grows with each new piece, the next feeding off what came before, but it needs consistent and diligent editing of those results. Given that, the software can become progressively smarter.

Just like with the gifted child, though, who can never learn everything about the given subject, the feedback loop that indexing software can create won’t last forever. Eventually, progress will slow down. There’s a big difference between the highly accurate search results it delivers and perfectly accurate search results, an unattainable goal.

Voltaire’s aphorism, “Perfection is the enemy of the good,” applies well here. The “rage to master” in the gifted child depends on progress and satisfaction. Attempting perfection undermines both. Progress will slow to a halt, denying the child the satisfaction that was the driving force in the first place.

Of course, we’re talking about software here, so feelings and stuff like that don’t actually apply. Where it does apply is with the user, though, who “motivates” the software by feeding it content. They are the impetus for software’s education, giving it new material while honing and fine-tuning the output. All of this delivers accurate results and the user gets the feeling of satisfaction.

Indexing software has the “rage to master” content because it was built to serve that purpose. It can’t do anything alone, though. It takes a dedicated team of editors to feed it that content and interpret the results. The responsibility is on them to understand how to leverage the results into valuable commodities. Without that side of it, the software achieves very little.

The emergence of Big Data has made this increasingly vital to business in industries of any stripe. The amount of data is growing at an astonishing rate and shows no signs of slowing down. If it was difficult to collect and analyze large amounts of content manually a few decades ago, imagine the struggle today with the glut of tablets, phones, and computers collecting and transmitting data every moment of the day.

There is so much out there that even a large team of editors can struggle to sort and analyze it with much effectiveness or insight. But this is exactly where the feedback loop created by indexing software can change the game. The software speeds the process, facilitating the analysis, but it can’t make decisions on its own. The editors are absolutely crucial to the accuracy of the software’s output. It starts with an analysis of a single batch of content, but with their guidance, that analysis builds on itself with each new batch. Before long, patterns start to emerge.

Now, the people who would have had to endure the tedium of slowly going through the data by hand can work with these emergent patterns instead. This is a far more meaningful way to interact with data and enables new ways to look at the results. Now, people can more quickly and easily identify and react to trends in their industry.

In publishing, this means understanding how users search for content and potentially directing them to content they may not initially have found valuable. Using Data Harmony, the publisher has a controlled vocabulary that narrowly and accurately directs searches, but it also allows them to observe and analyze how the user searches and what else they search for, which gives them tools find patterns in their customer base and tailor future initiatives to their specific needs.

The mountain of data in this world is only going to continue to grow, so while large-scale analysis is important today, it will be even more important tomorrow, next week, and in a year. Who knows what the landscape will look like in a decade, but we can safely speculate that the positive feedback loop that emerges from software like Data Harmony will enable organizations to handle it, no matter how massive it may have grown.

Daryl Loomis
Access Innovations

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