Metadata Increases Specificity

May 19, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, Taxonomy

West Point Underwriters has chosen some new technology to manage metadata to address the specific needs of the insurance selling process. KMWorld brought this news to our attention in their article, “Addressing the challenges of metadata.”

Concept Searching’s conceptClassifier for SharePoint and conceptTaxonomyWorkflow are the catalyst of Web technologies designed to help reduce unnecessary costs and increase efficiency. Concept Searching reports that the taxonomy component gives users an easy-to-use set of tools to develop an enterprise metadata framework. This is specially designed for subject matter experts and will improve search results.

Having a defined taxonomy can help promote collaboration and connections. The taxonomy is a hierarchical view of a controlled vocabulary or a list of terms in their preferred form. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies. By focusing on making information findable, we produce knowledge organization that works.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Uncommon Expectations

May 15, 2015  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

It is not uncommon to hear folks describe their supervisors as dysfunctional, but that is somewhat vague for describing behavior. Are they manic? Do they expect too much? Do they take credit for your work? The Washington Post brought these interesting considerations to our attention in their article, “How dysfunctional is your boss?”

Researchers at the University of Louisville recently published a paper in which they addressed that question by creating a “taxonomy” of bad leadership. I use the term taxonomy loosely, but the classification is very interesting. The result was a four-square chart that plots where your boss’s behavior actually lies on a scale from annoying to traumatic, and low to high dysfunction. The takeaway is helping employees form a response or action based on the behaviors that a manager exhibits.

True taxonomies can help manage big data by providing a solid standards-based taxonomy to index against. The results are comprehensive and consistent search results. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies because of consistency.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

The Standards of Taxonomies

May 12, 2015  
Posted in News, Standards, Taxonomy

For the average reader, details like hyphens may seem irrelevant to the content and overall message. But those in the taxonomy field understand all too well how important details can be in classifying data and retrieving it easily. Making content findable is the name of the game. This interesting information came from jboyd.net the post, “Aves—A Taxonomy in Flux.”

The author talks about stylistic considerations, which in some circles is like talking about politics. No one will ever agree on one method. For example, gray vs. grey or hyphens to break up words for scanning efficiency. We just have to accept the fact that they will not always look the same, but they will be pronounced the same.

The International Ornithological Congress (IOC) maintains the IOC World Bird List and they are a good example of having accommodations for the English names of birds. This approach extends beyond the world of birds.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Access Innovations, Inc. Releases Data Harmony® Version 3.10

May 11, 2015  
Posted in Access Insights, Featured, Taxonomy

Access Innovations, Inc. is pleased to announce the release of Version 3.10 of its Data Harmony Suite of software tools.

The Data Harmony Suite provides content management solutions to improve information organization by systematically applying a taxonomy or thesaurus in total integration, with patented content extraction methods. MAIstro, the award-winning flagship software module of the Data Harmony product line, combines Thesaurus Master® (for taxonomy creation and maintenance) with M.A.I. (Machine Aided Indexer) for interactive text analysis and better subject tagging. XIS® (XML Intranet System) offers powerful content management and metadata creation tools and completes the Data Harmony Suite.

Data Harmony Version 3.10 features significant enhancements and new features throughout the software suite. These features greatly improve editorial efficiency through changes to functionality and overall clarity.

Most significantly, Data Harmony Version 3.10 now allows much easier use of the software from non-Java based platforms, such as PHP, .NET, etc. It has always been possible to connect to the software using a non-Java platform, but this allows a broader base of users easy access to the Data Harmony software.

“It is exciting for me to see these changes put into action,” said Lamine Idjeraoui, the lead software engineer of the Access Innovations programming team. “Data Harmony 3.10 has so much that will make our clients’ work easier and more efficient.”

System-wide improvements include:

  • expanded API options, including JSON as a format for the getSuggestedTerms API
  • an improved, modernized look and feel to the GUI, including the ability to change font style and size for improved customizability
  • updated notifications

Improvements to M.A.I. include:

  • color-coding and line numbering in the Rule Building screen, greatly increasing manageability of long rules
  • a new dropdown suggested syntax code menu, making rule building easier and more viewable
  • an expanded maximum rule length, facilitating even the most complex concepts

Thesaurus Master includes the following improvements:

  • assignment of multiple facet notations to a single thesaurus term
  • drag-and-drop functionality in the thesaurus view
  • ability to double-click a term in the thesaurus view to change the term

XIS improvements include the following:

  • unlimited search parameter fields for unlimited granularity
  • multiple ways to sort search results for improved customization
  • the ability to change field colors of the GUI, allowing users to highlight specific fields

“These changes to Data Harmony are outstanding. I look forward to our current and future users seeing all the improvements we have made,” states Bob Kasenchak, head of product development. “This is the best release to date. We continue to embrace OWL, SKOS, RDF, and other formats even as the platform broadens its base.”

For further information, visit www.accessinn.com.

About Access Innovations, Inc. – www.accessinn.com, www.dataharmony.com, www.taxodiary.com

Founded in 1978, Access Innovations has extensive experience with Internet technology applications, master data management, database creation, thesaurus/taxonomy creation, and semantic integration. Access Innovations’ Data Harmony software includes machine aided indexing, thesaurus management, an XML Intranet System (XIS), and metadata extraction for content creation developed to meet production environment needs. Data Harmony is used by publishers, governments, and corporate clients throughout the world.

Improve Collaboration Through Data

May 11, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, Taxonomy

Qlik has introduced a new analytics platform to support the development of custom analytics applications, including web mash-ups. Business Wire brought this interesting information to our attention in their article, “Qlik Introduces Developer Platform for Data Visualization and Analysis.”

The Qlik® Analytics Platform is designed specifically for developers to build data-driven apps to power and differentiate their organization. This new platform can be used to extend the reach of business intelligence strategies to partners and customers. This development enables users to foster greater collaboration and interaction through data.

Having a defined taxonomy can help promote collaboration and connections. The taxonomy is a hierarchical view of a controlled vocabulary or a list of terms in their preferred form. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies. By focusing on making information findable, we produce knowledge organization that works.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

 

Flexibility for Users in Classification

May 6, 2015  
Posted in indexing, News, Taxonomy

TITUS has released Classification Suite 4. The new version of its data identification and information protection suite uses content and context to automatically classify and protect information as users handle it, and allows manual and guided classification for maximum flexibility and user engagement. KMWorld brought this news to us in their article, “Automated unstructured data classification, protection.”

Flexibility is important when it comes to developing a classification system. It is important to remember the value of a solid taxonomy and its role in the search process. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Access Innovations has extensive experience in constructing taxonomies for academic publishers, and can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Taxonomies Identify Strategies

May 6, 2015  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

Because there is no reliable way to choose strategies that are appropriate for implementing guidelines facing different barriers, a scoping systematic review was performed on MEDLINE and EMBASE covering the years from 2004 to 2013. From studies that evaluated the implementation of guidelines on arthritis, diabetes, colorectal cancer, and heart failure, the data was extracted and summarized. Interventions were mapped against a published taxonomy of guideline implementation strategies. 7th Space Interactive brought this information to our attention in their article, “Trends in guideline implementation: a scoping systematic review.”

What were the results? Education for professionals or patients and print material were the most commonly employed strategies for translating guidelines to practice. Mapping of strategies onto the published taxonomy identified gaps in guideline implementation that represent opportunities for future research and expanded the taxonomy.

True taxonomies can help manage big data by providing a solid standards-based taxonomy to index against. The results are comprehensive and consistent search results. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies because of consistency.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Taxonomy Blogs – The Big Picture

May 4, 2015  
Posted in Access Insights, Featured, Taxonomy

dreamstime_m_20414095© Icefields | Dreamstime.comBlog Icons Photo

We who blog on TaxoDiary know that it’s not the only blog that has to do with taxonomies and such. There are a few others out in cyberspace, and each has its own character. Let’s take a look at some of them, starting with what we know best.

TaxoDiary

You already must know something about TaxoDiary; you’re reading it right now. Maybe you haven’t read the description, though, which might provide some new insight:

TaxoDiary covers all types of knowledge organization systems (KOS), and related subjects. It is designed to provide the taxonomist, indexing and content professional with news and opinions about metatagging, and the application of KOS to increase findability of information objects within or across large collections of information, structured in databases, or unstructured in content repositories using controlled vocabularies. These activities are not unique to a single country or language, but rather shared and active globally.  It is part of our effort to keep abreast with the constantly changing field and to provide us information for research and used in consideration for the creation of new products and services. We will provide a regular stream of information about these topics and hope to share with you an informative and lively forum for discussion worldwide.

TaxoDiary is somewhat unique in that new posts appear each weekday.

The Accidental Taxonomist

The Accidental Taxonomist blog is written by Heather Hedden, perhaps best known for her book The Accidental Taxonomist. In the first post, in 2011, Heather gave a preview that turned out to hold true for the subsequent years:

Where will my new blog post ideas come from?

As a consultant, I am constantly engaging in new taxonomy projects with new experiences, new lessons to be learned, and new insights into the field. My client names should be kept confidential, so writing complete case studies may not be feasible, but the short informal nature of a blog post is quite appropriate to share some thoughts.

I also attend a number of conferences during the course of a year, and there are always new ideas coming out of these events. Some of my blog posts will be based on my own presentation topics, but not a repeat of the slide bullets, though. Instead I will provide some commentary about the presentation topic, such as why it is significant, timely, of interest, or what my concerns are. Other posts will be my observations an ideas gleaned form what others presented.

I may decide to revisit a topic in my book for a blog post. But I could also explore some new direction of topics related to taxonomies, such as content management, information architecture, search, or digital asset management.

The Accidental Taxonomist blog averages about one very substantial post per month.

The Taxonomy Blog

From the name, it’s fairly clear what this blog is about. While no longer active, it is still online (at least for the time being) and has some very useful posts on taxonomy philosophy and methodology. It was formerly maintained by taxonomist Marlene Rockmore, with help from Heather Hedden. To give you an idea of the approach, here’s how Marlene describes herself:

I call myself the “Classy Taxonomist.” I help organizing concepts which leads to clear thinking, better analysis, and results. I use taxonomies to help you figure out how to communicate by sorting meaning into buckets. Once you have buckets, you can then build interfaces and processes more efficiently. Big Bird once said “One of these things is not like the other.” I’ve been doing this since 1986. Clients include Harvard Business School, Digital, 6.2Million Tax Override, Conoco Philips, Boston College, O’Reilly, and Google.

Earley & Associates blog

Earley & Associates is a consulting organization headed by prominent knowledge management expert Seth Earley. Their blog covers a wide range of information management topics, but the posts indexed with “Taxonomy” far outnumber the posts indexed with other topics. The website has a page of research suggestions, one of which is to “check out our blog” if “you want to get a pulse on what is new and hot.”

Taxonomy Watch

This blog had the tagline “A weblog about taxonomies and their application in organizing digital content. Also includes related topics such as controlled vocabulary, thesauri, topic maps, ontologies and semantic technologies.” It was maintained by Gwen Harris, and discontinued in 2012. Gwen wrote in 2012 that the blog would be taken down soon, but as I write this, it’s still there. There’s a lot of good stuff there; take a look.

Barbara Gilles, Taxonomist
Access Innovations, Inc.

Depth of Classifications

May 1, 2015  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

We know that when a taxonomy is well-designed and rooted in standards, it can make finding your content easy and thorough. However, the meaning of the word ‘taxonomy’ is often confused  with that for ‘classification’ or even ‘glossary’. This interesting information was brought to our attention by Scoop in their article, “Talk Nation : Kristin Christman on the Taxonomy of Peace.”

The topic of peace in the Middle East is not an easy one to wrap up in a nice neat package … or taxonomy. The subject is so faceted with opinions, histories, religions, fears, biases, and so many emotions that they deserve their own taxonomy.

Kristin Y. Christman, author of The Taxonomy of Peace, focuses her work on the aggressive and defensive roots of violence in the Middle East and the United States, as well as mental, legal, and physical escalators of violence, and solutions to violence. These are most definitely categories, but even the term solution is subjective. I am sure this is an interesting and informative read, and I will definitely be adding it to my book list soon, but is it a taxonomy?

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Classifying Science

April 30, 2015  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, Taxonomy

The INIS (International Nuclear Information System) Thesaurus is a valuable and useful product used by the INIS Secretariat and Member States to index documents for input into the INIS Collection and to facilitate information retrieval for global users of the collection. This interesting information came from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in their article, “INIS Thesaurus latest developments.”

By continually updating, it is able to stay abreast of new developments in terminology of nuclear science and technology. The INIS Thesaurus includes 30,822 terms and has been translated into eight languages. New terms from all areas of nuclear science and technology are proposed by Member States and the INIS Secretariat and approved by the Google based Thesaurus Advisory Group.

Developing a taxonomy or classification system organized into conceptually similar categories can help users gain a better understanding of the taxonomy subject area. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should always look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

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