dataCloud, LLC and Access Innovations, Inc. Launch Semantics-Based Big Data Solution

February 8, 2016  
Posted in Access Insights, Featured, Taxonomy

dataCloud, LLC and Access Innovations, Inc. have teamed up to create Topic Seeker™, a semantics-based solution for big data. Topic Seeker analyzes text-based content and organizes it by topic, allowing publishers and other organizations to see changing trends in their respective fields, develop conference tracks based on current topic relevance, and many other applications.

“Analytics today are focused on numbers,” explains Jeffrey Gordon, CEO of dataCloud, LLC. “Topic Seeker enhances that experience by analyzing the language associated with the numerical data. By incorporating a taxonomy or ontology into big data analysis, we can decode market trends with greatly increased specificity. For example, it’s easy to look at the numbers and see that sales of a certain product are declining, but those numbers don’t provide any qualitative assessment of a customer’s sentiment about the product. Leveraging Topic Seeker to analyze the words those customers are using improves your understanding of the market for that product.”

Using data visualization techniques, Topic Seeker provides a rapid-fire solution for organizations facing the challenge of ever-growing amounts of information. Topic Seeker works via an API that ingests, processes, delivers, and visualizes metadata in near real-time. Topic Seeker’s algorithm allows for nearly 20 visualization options, n-gram paper clustering, and topic domain correlation mapping.

Topic Seeker Test Clusters Topic Seeker test_tree

“Working together on this project is exciting for us,” says Bob Kasenchak, Director of Business Development for Access Innovations, Inc. “The combination of hard-core coding for big data, semantic analysis of text, and visualization techniques has resulted in a powerful system. The possibilities for implementation are huge in a wide variety of industries.”

Chord Diagram

Access Innovations and dataCloud look forward to further refinement of Topic Seeker and are excited to present its possibilities to current users and prospective new clients.

 

About Access Innovations, Inc. – www.accessinn.com, www.dataharmony.com, www.taxodiary.com

Founded in 1978, Access Innovations has extensive experience with Internet technology applications, master data management, database creation, thesaurus/taxonomy creation, and semantic integration. Access Innovations’ Data Harmony software includes automatic indexing, thesaurus management, an XML Intranet System (XIS), and metadata extraction for content creation developed to meet production environment needs. Data Harmony is used by publishers, governments, and corporate clients throughout the world.

 

About dataCloud, LLChttp://www.datacloudllc.com

dataCloud, LLC is a developer of innovative analytics software that allows users to derive more meaningful information from their data. From businesses wanting to know what positive or negative terms are most common when discussing their newly-launched product, to research organizations seeking to better understand what areas of study may be underfunded, dataCloud’s solutions break down complex data into usable intelligence.

Digging Deep into Hierarchy

February 5, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News, Taxonomy

Understanding polyhierarchy within taxonomies can be a challenge, but not an insurmountable one. This interesting information came from Heather Hedden’s blog, The Accidental Taxonomist, in the post titled, “Polyhierarchy in the SharePoint Term Store.”

Polyhierarchy means a taxonomy term has more than one broader term or parent term. In a traditional hierarchical taxonomy structure, a term has one broader term (unless it is the top term, in which case it has no broader term) and multiple narrower terms.

That seems clear as….mud? It may appear to the user that the term is duplicated in different locations in the taxonomy, but this duplication is in appearances only, because it is the same term.

Hedden does a great job of digging into this topic and helping even the newest of newbies get a good grasp of the subject.

How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Name of the Game

February 3, 2016  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

For the average reader, details like hyphens may seem irrelevant to the content and overall message. But those in the taxonomy field understand all too well how important details can be in classifying data and retrieving it easily. Making content findable is the name of the game. This interesting information came from jboyd.net the post, “Aves—A Taxonomy in Flux.”

The author talks about stylistic considerations, which in some circles is like talking about politics. No one will ever agree on one method. For example, gray vs. grey or hyphens to break up words for scanning efficiency. We just have to accept the fact that they will not always look the same, but they will be pronounced the same.

The International Ornithological Congress (IOC) maintains the IOC World Bird List and they are a good example of having accommodations for the English names of birds. This approach extends beyond the world of birds.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

New Partnership Increases Access

February 2, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News, Taxonomy

A new strategic alliance was recently announced between Artstor and ITHAKA. This new partnership will benefit thousands of colleges, universities, schools, museums, and other educational institutions. This interesting information came to us from Library Technology in their article, “Alliance will enhance access to multimedia digital resources to support education and research.”

Artstor, JSTOR and ITHAKA were all created as mission-driven nonprofit organizations with initial support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Now together, they will be better able to collaborate in developing new tools and in taking advantage of core capabilities.

JSTOR was established in 1997 and merged with Ithaka in 2009, after which the combined entity was renamed “ITHAKA”. JSTOR is a cloud-based library where scholars, students and the public can access thousands of journals, books, images and other primary source content, as well as tools that promote research, teaching and sharing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Groundhog Day: Names and Recursions

February 1, 2016  
Posted in Access Insights, Featured, Taxonomy

I’m sure you’re all just like me and waiting anxiously to hear the results from Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, whence this very day we will find out from Punxsy Phil whether spring will come early this year or we have to wait six more weeks (pro tip: In the Northern Hemisphere, it’s always going to fall on March 20th or 21st).  As ridiculous as the holiday might seem to some of us, though, there are things about groundhogs and Groundhog Day that are pretty interesting.

IMG_0959

Photo, Aaron Silvers, http://www.flickr.com/photos/silvers/24543841/ / CC BY-SA 2.0

Firstly, nobody seems capable of agreeing on what the rodent is called. The holiday would suggest that groundhog is the accepted term, but growing up, I always knew them as woodchucks. And there’s the well-known tongue twister (“How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?”), which lends credence to its status as the accepted term. But depending on where one resides, the critter is also known as land-beaver, land-squirrel, rock chuck, pasture pig, and my personal favorite: whistle-pig. Some also call it a marmot, but that’s really a broader classification of the genus to which the groundhog belongs (Latin name: Marmota monax). All groundhogs are marmots, but not all marmots are groundhogs, which is plain old Taxonomy 101.

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Family: Sciuridae
Genus: Marmota
Species: M. monax

While there are plenty of names for the animal writ large, there are also more celebrity groundhogs than you may be aware; although Punxsy Phil is the most prominent, plenty of states have them. Georgia boasts General Beauregard Lee; Ohio, Buckeye Lee; North Carolina celebrates Groundhog Day with Sir Walter Wally; and Alabama holds Smith Lake Jake to be the true authority on winter’s end. Montana has three: Warren Whitefish, Dayton Dennis, and Moose City Moses. Wiarton, Ontario has a whole festival surrounding the albino groundhog Wiarton Willie, which even features a hockey tournament.

There’s even a song about it, “Oh, Murmeltier” (sung to the tune of “Oh, Tannenbaum”) for which professor and marmot scholar K.B. Armitage of the University of Kansas has written English lyrics:

“Oh Whistlepig, oh Whistlepig,

We celebrate your famous day.

Oh Whistlepig, to you we pray

That winter soon will go away.

We like the sun and daffodils.

We’ve had too much of winter’s chills.

Oh, marmot friend, we’re warning you,

If winter stays, you’ll be rockchuck stew!”

…which is just plain weird.

Then, we have “Groundhog Day,” one of the most enduring comedy films of recent decades. In it, a meteorologist named Phil Connors (played by Bill Murray) travels to Punxsutawney to cover the Groundhog Day event. While there, he gets stuck in a recursive feedback loop, in which February 2nd is replayed over and over, while he tries to break the loop and move on to February 3rd (and get the heck out of Punxsutawney).

Bill Murray

All comedy hijinks aside, movies are ripe for classification. Genres, while easily arguable, are the broadest way by which we classify them. In the case of “Groundhog Day,” it’s a comedy, but we also have drama, horror, etc. Sometimes, such as in this case, the classification is fairly obvious, but some films rightly belong to multiple genres, such as horror-comedies, or dramedies (a term that I personally despise, but it’s out there in common use).

Then, for some movies, we sub-classify by the film’s content or style. Film noir, for instance, isn’t a genre of its own; they’re dramas, but they’re particular kinds of dramas with a specific tone and stylistic touch. If somebody wants to watch something of that nature, it’s much smarter to search for “film noir” than to try wading through the thousands of “dramas” that have been released in the century-plus of cinema—and would thereby be returned in an online search.

But we classify movies in ways other than genre, as well. The MPAA rating system is designed to tell consumers whether the movie is suitable for their age group or comfort level. Sometimes, we classify by their overarching plot, such as the biopic, the road movie, or the coming-of-age film, independent of genre. One can classify them by country of origin, or level of the movie’s budget, or really any way at all.

But let’s go back to “Groundhog Day” and the recursive feedback loop in which the main character gets stuck. It’s funny when it happens to Bill Murray, but it can be devastating to taxonomy. Say, for instance, you have a taxonomy with a top term of Business. A sensible narrower term under this could be Risk. That could be used for any number of kinds of risk, but in this case, the taxonomist adds a narrower term of Risk Management.  Under that, one could place Insurance, which easily falls under Risk Management. So far, everything looks just right

Business

Risk

Risk management

Then, somebody comes along to screw around with the taxonomy, and looks at Insurance without looking at the broader terms first. It’s easily arguable that under Insurance, if one wasn’t paying attention, could go Risk Management—of which of course a primary topic is Risk.

Insurance

Risk Management

Risk

When that happens, you get this:

Recursion

Recursions of this kind are the taxonomic equivalent of what happens in “Groundhog Day,” and it’s not good, or even funny. You’ll go on forever in this loop, getting nowhere and draining system resources at an increasing pace.

So today, we can all have a laugh at a movie, watch some hockey, and gather around to see a groundhog (or whatever you want to call it) leave its burrow, all because of Groundhog Day. But stay warm, because (spoiler alert) there is absolutely six more weeks of winter to come.

Daryl Loomis
Access Innovations

Originally posted February 2, 2015.

Taxonomy and Metadata Specialist Needed

January 26, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News, Taxonomy

To be as helpful as possible to those in the fields of taxonomy, indexing, ontology, etc., we are sharing career opportunities that we find with our readers. Even if you are not in the market for a career move, it is always good to stay on top of what is available and how the fields are evolving.

Scholastic is looking for a Taxonomy and Metadata Specialist to join the Software and Technology Services’ Taxonomy and Metadata Services Group (TMSG) to support channel-specific and enterprise-level initiatives. This is a full-time, permanent position located in Scholastic’s New York City offices.

The person filling this position joins the TMSG with responsibility for designing and implementing taxonomies and metadata structures for a variety of applications with a high degree of usability for both internal and external Scholastic clients. Learn more and apply here.

If you are looking to change positions, good luck on your search.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Facets vs. Filters

January 22, 2016  
Posted in News, search, Taxonomy

What exactly is faceted searching and how could it help you? Lucidea brought this interesting information to us in their recent blog post, “A Firm Foundation for Faceted Search.”

Faceted search is a method for accessing information organized according to a faceted classification system. This allows users to explore a collection of information by applying multiple filters. Faceted searching works best when your content is well organized and well cataloged.

The terms filters and facets are often used interchangeably. While they are related, these concepts have important differences. Both are tools to help users narrow down large sets of content, but faceted navigation is both more flexible and powerful and more difficult to create and maintain.

There are certainly benefits to faceted search. For example, they are domain specific, so librarians and subject specialists can build specific taxonomies for each domain. In turn, this increases the speed and efficiency of finding your content.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Artist Classified

January 14, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News, Taxonomy

You know my fascination with unique taxonomies and classifications. This past week, we lost a cultural icon in David Bowie’s death. So I consider this latest find a treasure. Vulture brought this one to us in their article, “A Taxonomy of David Bowie’s Many Personas and Their Many Imitators.”

David Bowie’s musical influence has cast a large shadow ever since he broke out as a “out of the box” pop star with his 1972 classic The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars. However, he was not just a key player in alternative music. He was a true artist in fashion, art, and life. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Bowie would appreciate this attempt at classifying his many different persona.

As with Bowe, a strong standards-based taxonomy is one with true integrity. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Taxonomist Position Available

January 12, 2016  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

To be as helpful as possible to those in the fields of taxonomy, indexing, ontology, etc., we are sharing career opportunities that we find with our readers. Even if you are not in the market for a career move, it is always good to stay on top of what is available and how the fields are evolving.

There is a Data Ontologist/Taxonomist position available for the Powertek Corporation in Fort Belvoir, Virginia. This position would primarily be responsible for developing, updating and adapting domain ontologies for information extraction, data modeling and analysis. In addition, they would fine-tune semantic products using ontological software tools to perform common indexing of data. Learn more and apply here.

If you are looking to change positions, good luck on your search.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

The Power of Metadata

January 4, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News, search, Taxonomy

Publishers have come to a harsh realization that they must participate in metadata. It is important to develop standards and improve the accuracy of inputting the data to reach companies outside of their traditional customer base. The Bookseller brought this news to us in their article, “Publishers need to focus on metadata.”

Meaningful metadata is crucial for the publishing industry especially when e-books and apps continue to grow at a rate faster than print books each year. Consumers are more distracted than ever. They can access every form of mass media on one device in their pocket so the publishing world’s share of that attention is microbial. Good metadata is key if there is any chance the consumer is going to commit their time.

It is important to remember the value of a solid taxonomy. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

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