Breaking Down the Data Barriers

January 29, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, Taxonomy

Technology continues to advance on a daily basis. What was wondrously new yesterday will seem archaic in just a few months. This “advancement” of technology has brought information to our fingertips at a faster speed than ever before and in unbelievable quantities. KMWorld brought this news to our attention in their article, “Universal, federated or unified search in the land of information silos.”

Information access and retrieval within most organizations is not a smooth process. Few organizations have one simple search system for all their data. Most have multiple options, and that number grows with the size of the organization. The challenge with this situation is not allowing the data to become entities in and of themselves – entities that create walls of division.

Ontologies and other controlled vocabularies help ensure that machine-assisted or fully automated indexing is comprehensive, regardless of what you are indexing. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies to make their information findable.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Internships Available

January 28, 2015  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

As we strive to be as helpful as possible to those in the fields of taxonomy, indexing, ontology, etc., we are excited to share career opportunities that we find with our readers. Even if you aren’t in the market for a career move, it is always good to stay on top of what is available and how the fields are evolving.

One particular set of opportunitieser involves internships. Internships offer invaluable opportunities to gain experience in your chosen field. In the taxonomy field, it is important to have experts in a variety of subjects to fully understand the terms and components of a particular study area. Students familiar with taxonomic principles can bring valuable insight to a variety of jobs. The American Anthropological Association is sharing a list of internships that are available, while highlighting the value that one successful taxonomy-minded applicant offered. If you are the position to consider an internship, don’t limit yourself – think outside the job.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Handling the Email Chaos

January 21, 2015  
Posted in News, storage, Taxonomy

The voices, or maybe the rants, differ on the advantages of email for records management. We understand the storage challenges that come with the mass amounts of data created by email. In discovery alone, email poses challenges to even the strongest records management policies. This interesting topic was brought to us by the article, “Document management in the age of email,” from Fierce Content Management.

A recent survey from Pew Internet revealed that 61 percent of working Internet users who responded consider email to be “very important” to their jobs. It is important to note that this same kind of majority held in traditionally ‘white collar,’ office-based occupations. For those who take their jobs outside of the physical boundaries of the workplace at least occasionally, it was also deemed very important.

We know that email isn’t going anywhere, at least anytime soon. So the key is to create a document storage strategy that will enable discovery easily and with comprehensive results. Taxonomies can help with this.

How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Capturing the data is only part of the project. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

True Taxonomies

January 19, 2015  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

We know that when a taxonomy is well-designed and rooted in standards, it can make finding your content easy and thorough. However, the meaning of the word ‘taxonomy’ is often confused  with that for ‘classification’ or even ‘thesaurus’. This interesting information was brought to our attention by Scoop in their article, “Talk Nation : Kristin Christman on the Taxonomy of Peace.”

The topic of peace in the Middle East is not shallow, nor is it contained in a nice neat package … or taxonomy. The subject is so faceted with opinions, histories, religions, fears, biases, and so many emotions that they deserve their own taxonomy.

Kristin Y. Christman, author of The Taxonomy of Peace, focuses her work on the aggressive and defensive roots of violence in the Middle East and the United States, as well as mental, legal, and physical escalators of violence, and solutions to violence. These are most definitely categories, but even the term solution is subjective. I am sure this is an interesting and informative read, and I will definitely be adding it to my book list soon, but is it a taxonomy?

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Packrats Unite

January 13, 2015  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, storage, Taxonomy

Here we are at the beginning of a new year. Resolutions aside, it is great time to take inventory of your records and evaluate your records management plan. This suggestion came to us from the Green Bay Gazette in their article, “Purging the paper from your office — and your life.”

I confess. I am a packrat, hoarder, collector, or whatever you want to call it. I inherited it honestly from my mother and grandmother. When it comes to work, I call myself “IT’s nightmare and Legal’s dream”. I save every digital file and email. I use more than my share in storage, but when the general counsel comes over looking for “that thing we did a couple of years ago about the you know and the other things” – I have it and it is found with minimal effort.

I don’t pretend to set myself up as the perfect example of indexing and findability – not by a long shot. First of all, I am not a walking taxonomy. And we all know that the true way to achieve findability is through a strong taxonomy to index metadata against for future searches.

Knowing what to keep and what to throw away is a decision based on a number of factors, and those will differ from one organization to another.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Are You My Mummy?

January 6, 2015  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, Taxonomy

Animalmummies.net is a searchable database of ancient Egyptian animal mummies. The Animal Mummy Database search interface provides a good example of taxonomic facets. You can browse by Animal Type, Wrapping Type, or Museum. This interesting information came from The Ancient World Online blog in their post, “The Animal Mummy Database.”

Animal mummies were created by the millions during the Late Roman periods in Egypt, mostly to be used as votive offerings at temples of gods associated with those animals. During early excavations in Egypt, many animal mummies were dug up and discarded. Very few examples were saved and sent to museums. This site was created as a resource for both scholars and the interested public in the hopes that it may become a collaborative project to help gather information on animal mummies.

With any archiving project, it is important to remember the value of a solid taxonomy. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Capturing the data is only part of the project. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Marjorie M.K. Hlava’s Taxobook Published by Morgan Claypool

January 5, 2015  
Posted in Access Insights, Featured, Taxonomy

Access Innovations, Inc. is proud to announce the publication of The Taxobook, a three-volume series on taxonomies and thesauri, written by Marjorie M.K. Hlava, president of Access Innovations. The three volumes are part of a larger series, Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services, edited by Gary Marchionini, Dean of the School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and published by Morgan & Claypool Publishers.

Volume 1, The Taxobook: History, Theories, and Concepts of Knowledge Organization, introduces the foundations of classification, covering theories from the ancient Greek philosophers to modern thinkers. This volume also includes a glossary that covers all three volumes.

Volume 2, The Taxobook: Principles and Practices of Taxonomy Construction, outlines the basic principles of creation and maintenance of taxonomies and thesauri. It also provides step-by-step instructions for building a taxonomy or thesaurus and discusses the various ways to get started on a taxonomy construction project.

Volume 3, The Taxobook: Applications, Implementation, and Integration in Search, covers putting taxonomies into use in as many ways as possible to maximize retrieval for users.

“This book has been a labor of love for me,” said Ms. Hlava. “I believe firmly in the value of taxonomies and their place within information systems, and I have wanted to share my thoughts with a larger audience for some time. I hope these books will contribute to a better understanding of the different ways taxonomies can be implemented and why information management professionals should embrace them.”

“Margie Hlava’s lectures on taxonomy pack a lifetime of experience creating vocabularies for corporations and organizations into narrative and case studies that will delight researchers and teachers and inspire students,” remarked Gary Marchionini. “Her love of language and organizational structure comes through in every chapter of the work.”

“It is our pleasure to have Margie Hlava as a Morgan & Claypool author!” commented Diane Cerra of Morgan & Claypool. “She and her Access Innovations team have made a much needed contribution to our publishing program, and to the community at large. These volumes will serve practitioners for many years to come. In addition, Margie and her group are a joy to work with: a personable, responsible, and responsive team that enabled us to quickly produce this collection.”

The books are available through Morgan & Claypool Publishers in either online or print format.

 

About Access Innovations, Inc. – www.accessinn.com, www.dataharmony.com, www.taxodiary.com

Founded in 1978, Access Innovations has extensive experience with Internet technology applications, master data management, database creation, thesaurus/taxonomy creation, and semantic integration. Access Innovations’ Data Harmony software includes automatic indexing, thesaurus management, an XML Intranet System (XIS), and metadata extraction for content creation developed to meet production environment needs. Data Harmony is used by publishers, governments, and corporate clients throughout the world.

99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall

January 5, 2015  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, Taxonomy

Taxonomies and classifications are not only helpful, but critical to making your content findable. This is true regardless of the topic or data – even when it is beer. Business Insider brought this interesting information to our attention in their article, “Everything You Need To Know About Beer, In One Chart.”

I confess, I am not a beer drinker. Though the varieties intrigue me, I’d much rather have a bottle of wine than 99 bottles of beer. Being that there are so many styles and types of beer, it is difficult to have a good understanding of them all. We found this taxonomy graphic of most major beer styles to help you put your favorite cold ones into context.

bi_graphics_beertaxonomy

Developing a classification system organized into conceptually similar categories can help users gain a better understanding of the taxonomy subject area. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Making Informed Decisions About Your Content

January 2, 2015  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, Taxonomy

The recent launch of TopQuadrant’s Version 4.6 of TopBraid Suite is designed to simplify the development and management of standards-based, model-driven solutions for enterprise taxonomy, ontology and metadata management. KMWorld brought this news to us in their article, “Taxonomy, ontology and metadata management.”

Version 4.6 includes the TopBraid Reference Data Manager (TopBraid RDM), which enhances governance of reference data storage and distribution with the addition of relevant and easily accessible metadata.

It is important to have a comprehensive search feature and quality indexing against a standards-based taxonomy. It isn’t a cookie cutter process. Choose the right partner in technology, especially when your content is in their hands. Access Innovations is known as a leader in database production, standards development, and creating and applying taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Common Factors

January 2, 2015  
Posted in indexing, News, Taxonomy

What do legal jurisdictions and leprechauns have in common? More than one might think. In the world of classification, words like ‘extinct’ and ‘endangered’ could be applied to both and many more genres. This interesting topic came from the law magazine, Slaw, in their article, “Of Unicorns and Leprechauns: Applying the Threatened Species Taxonomy to Administrative Law.”

The depth and the variety of subjects is a perfect illustration of why organizations need a content management system that accommodates multiple descriptors/keywords/subject terms/whatever from a taxonomy or thesaurus. Developing a classification system organized into conceptually similar categories can help users gain a better understanding of the taxonomy subject area. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

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