Auto Assumptions

November 24, 2014  
Posted in Autoindexing, metadata, News

No one will argue how helpful auto-classification or auto-indexing is to the world of making content findable. But never forget that there are loads of folks working prior and in the background to make the “auto” be auto. This interesting topic came from the blog post, “Jet Packs, Cars That Drive Themselves, and Autoclassification” from Earley & Associates.

Stand in any department store checkout and you will hear someone blame user error on the computer, and I confess I have been guilty of assuming it was the technology that caused the problem. I want to remind these people that a computer only does what a human has programmed it to do. Auto-classification technology provides stellar performance when applied in the correct environments and given enough context.

Proper indexing against a strong standards-based taxonomy increases the findability of data. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Metadata Retention Concerns

November 20, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News, search

The proposed changes to telecommunications law in the Australian parliament have some worried and others concerned. Metadata retention, online privacy, and telecommunications industry worries are certainly hot topics, but how important are they to the average Australian? What is the impact on their privacy? We found this information in the Financial Review article,”Data retention: a delicate balancing act.”

The bill would amend a 35-year-old act that prohibits the interception of, or access to, telecommunications without consent, although law enforcement agencies can do so with a warrant. Significant changes in technology have resulted in a need to update the act, especially to manage digital communications and to address national security concerns. Sound familiar?

The bill would require Australian telecommunication companies to retain “metadata” for two years. The bill is specific as to what makes up metadata, and telecommunication companies will have up to two years to implement this scheme. Many of the larger companies already do this. Organizations are constantly facing the challenges of handling data, especially in relation to storage, size, and security.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Making Digital Content Findable

November 20, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News, search

A National Institutes of Health (NIH) program is planned to consolidate a massive amount of scattered biomedical research data. It was recently announced that the program will include the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine, which received a $9.2 million grant. The Times of San Diego brought this news to our attention in their articl.e, “Money Flows to UCSD for ‘Big Data’ Bio-Med Search Engine.”

The NIH announced that a dozen centers for data would be created around the United States. In addition to that exciting news, the Scripps Research Institute and the Scripps Translational Science Institute said they would take part in a center to be established at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

A UCSD-led team plans to develop a strategy for cataloging and indexing biomedical datasets. Dataset indexing is considered a vital step toward being able to build a searchable online digital library.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Learn More About SharePoint

November 19, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News

Do you struggle with finding items that have been stored in Sharepoint? If you are looking for assistance and how to improve access to your internal documents, an upcoming webinar might be just what you are looking for. The free webinar Bringing Order to Chaos: Using SharePoint for Content Management is scheduled for Tuesday, December 2, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. ET.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Following the Lead

November 19, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News

Lately, we have discussed digital projects a lot. In today’s increasingly digital world, it is important that the American public has access to all appropriate federal government communications to improve transparency and increase trust. In his first day in office, President Obama signed the memorandum on Transparency and Open Government, calling for a new era of open and accountable government. Yet here we are five years after the president’s commitment, and the government has yet to deliver. Federal Times brought this topic to our attention in their article, “Hybrid records management can enable open government.”

Given that the federal government is the single largest producer of information in the United States, moving towards digital information seems like an obvious route. Though digitization of information does produce a number of benefits, it doesn’t mean that everything should or can be converted to digital. There can be an improved workflow, and a streamlined process can result in an immediate return on investment. Benefits extend beyond cost savings to include stronger integration between departments.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Call for Papers for IASSIST

November 18, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News

There is a call for papers for the next International Association for Social Science Information Services & Technology (IASSIST) conference in June of 2015. IASSIST is an international organization of professionals working in and with information technology and data services to support research and teaching in the social sciences.

The theme of the 2015 conference is Bridging the Data Divide: Data in the International Context. Access to data is a continual challenge, and this conference is facing that fact head-on. Increasing budget concerns have placed strains on governments, universities, and other institutions in the provision of data services.

There are various formats and topics to submit papers on, even pecha kucha style. Review the options and consider contributing to the program.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

 

 

Age Symbolizes Wisdom

November 18, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, Taxonomy

Archiving, indexing, and making content findable are at the core of what we do. Many of our clients include scholars who devote more than a fair share of their time to older literature. The Scholarly Kitchen brought this news to our attention in their article, “Growing Impact of Older Articles.” Older articles are being defined as 10 years old or older. I won’t take offense to that.

Recently, some Google employees analyzed the paper, “On the Shoulders of Giants: The Growing Impact of Older Articles,” by Alex Verstak and found the age of citations was from 1990 to 2013. They report that scholars are citing proportionally more of the older literature. Most professionals would accept these findings as good news, considering the 24 hour news cycle these days and the slant towards the negative.

Quality taxonomies enable findability. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies that can help you generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Enhanced Ways to Find Enhanced Data

November 18, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News

Researchers at the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Infection and Global Health are building the world’s most comprehensive database describing human and animal pathogens. This big data project will be used to prevent and tackle disease outbreaks around the globe. This interesting information came from Phys.org in their article, “Using ‘Big Data’ approach to map relationships between human and animal diseases.” The Enhanced Infectious Diseases (EID2) database has been developed by the Liverpool University Climate and Infectious Diseases of Animals (LUCINDA) team and is funded by a BBSRC Strategic Tools and Resources Development Fund grant.

EID2 is using openly accessible information in a new way and thereby tracing the history of human and animal diseases to predict the effects of climate change on pathogens and in turn to produce maps showing which diseases are most likely in particular areas and to categorize the complex relationships between human and animal carriers and hosts of numerous pathogens. It will be interesting to watch as it develops and evolves.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Crosses All Trends

November 17, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News

Records management is coming out of the closet and embracing technology as it marches into the future. It has been viewed as an administrative requirement, afterthought, and cumbersome task for quite some time. Now the value of records management is finally being recognized. KMWorld brought this news to our attention in their article, “Records management: an expanding role.”

This doesn’t mean that it is a mastered art as of yet. There are learning curves and challenges with cloud-based information and the always changing social media content.

In contrast to paper records, as regulators are fully aware, even what are deemed the final versions of digital records are subject to manipulation, particularly if those records contain data that is contrary to a company’s compliance requirements.

The important factor of digital indexing is consistency, and what provides consistency? Standards. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Google and Health Care?

November 14, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News

Google’s latest adventure could change health care and medicine as well as add a whole new avenue of work. Google’s Head of Life Sciences, Andrew Conrad, recently announced that the company is building a nanoparticle platform that could one day be used to continuously measure a person’s health through ingestible nanoparticles. Gigaom brought this interesting news to us in their article, “After indexing all the things, Google now wants to go into your bloodstream.”

Indexing just took on a whole new meaning. Without mentioning anyone specifically, Conrad did say that Google wants to partner with others to make this nano platform commercially available. Google would leave all the data capturing and the cooperation with doctors and healthcare providers to those partners. Google’s role would be more like GE, which also doesn’t own everyone’s MRI, but simply is behind the technology powering MRI machines.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

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