Visualizing Your Data

February 10, 2016  
Posted in Access Insights, Business strategy, metadata, News

Data visualization is the presentation of data in a pictorial or graphical format. It enables decision makers to see analytics presented visually, so they can grasp difficult concepts or identify new patterns.

Visualizing complex data can be a challenge but also offers unique opportunities to direct perception without drowning in spreadsheets, numbers and queries.

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At 2016 Data Harmony Users Group (#DHUG2016) this week, Access Innovation’s staff members Jack Bruce and Bob Kasenchak shared how Data Harmony can help with data visualization and make your business development department very happy with the data you can provide them in a way that will move the organization forward in meeting its goals.

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Massive amounts of content is now the norm for most companies. Analyzing this volume of data and delivering real and usable information can be made easier with Data Harmony in a myriad ways with ease.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Governing on the Run

February 9, 2016  
Posted in Business strategy, metadata, News

The investments made by businesses in information governance and security, and embracing three new data classifications could prove beneficial in 2016. As devices are used for increasingly complex processes, data becomes more vulnerable to loss. Tech Target brought this news to us in their article, “New data classifications vital to information governance and security.

Information technology and security executives are developing comprehensive mobile data security plans and implementing stronger technology solutions. Governance challenges continue to grow as more employers adopt processes that allow mobile devices to perform work tasks. Workers no longer use devices to just check emails and their calendars, they have become not just a part of their every day life, they are used for increasingly complex processes. Unfortunately this means data becomes more vulnerable to loss.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Using Semantics in Governance

February 9, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News

Data governance requires a standards-based, semantic approach. Datanami brought us this information in their article, “A Semantic Approach to Big Data Governance.”

Big data is responsible for bringing organizations to the realization that the practical value of semantics enable them to maintain and improve governance principles over unruly unstructured and semi-structured data.

Semantic technologies play a pivotal role in a key aspect of governance—denoting common terms and definitions that are either used across business units or across the enterprise itself. Vocabularies enhanced by taxonomies can augment those definitions while filling out a repository of such terms by clarifying their meanings and the numerous points of differentiation in spelling and references for a common definition.

Semantic technology, artificial intelligence, and machine learning continue to evolve and be used in a variety of applications. It has never been more important to have someone with the expertise and knowledge handling your content, developing your taxonomies, and making your information findable.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Digging Deep into Hierarchy

February 5, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News, Taxonomy

Understanding polyhierarchy within taxonomies can be a challenge, but not an insurmountable one. This interesting information came from Heather Hedden’s blog, The Accidental Taxonomist, in the post titled, “Polyhierarchy in the SharePoint Term Store.”

Polyhierarchy means a taxonomy term has more than one broader term or parent term. In a traditional hierarchical taxonomy structure, a term has one broader term (unless it is the top term, in which case it has no broader term) and multiple narrower terms.

That seems clear as….mud? It may appear to the user that the term is duplicated in different locations in the taxonomy, but this duplication is in appearances only, because it is the same term.

Hedden does a great job of digging into this topic and helping even the newest of newbies get a good grasp of the subject.

How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Finding the Data

February 5, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News, search

TEMIS has launched Luxid 7, the seventh generation of its flagship semantic content enrichment platform. Luxid 7 promises a beefed-up scalable and robust semantic enrichment pipeline and includes a dedicated ontology management tool. Broadway World Geeks brought this to our attention in their article, “TEMIS Integrates Ontology Management and Semantic Enrichment in Luxid’ 7.”

When building a taxonomy or ontology, you want that model to be available across the enterprise, and not tied to one single program. All of this is done to make it a dynamic and comprehensive system with outstanding search results. Access Innovations provides Search Harmony to allow that same taxonomy/ontology to be used on the user search side to leverage the tagging of the documents and further enhance search results. A user can easily change the configuration of the ontology/thesaurus/taxonomy through our administrative module so the data model retains integrity by matching the guidelines of the standards while modifications are made to the user needs. This easily integrated feature is critical to quality, progressive search results.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Technology in Publishing Moves Forward

February 4, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News, Technology

Ringgold has announced that the 4.18 release of ScholarOne Manuscripts is now integrated in the Identify Database as an institutional authority file. Ringgold brought this news to our attention in their article, “ScholarOne Manuscripts now features Ringgold’s Identify Database for institutional affiliations.”

A simple user interface enables ScholarOne’s robust application to enforce accuracy standards for the institutional affiliations of authors, contributors, reviewers, and editors. Users can select the correct institution from an Identify-populated search, embedding the Ringgold Identifier and Institution Name into the manuscript metadata and user profile. This feature is now active for all 6,400 journals served by ScholarOne Manuscripts.

All ScholarOne publishers will benefit from authoritative affiliation data, and the enhanced ability to share data across the journal ecosystem.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

New Partnership Increases Access

February 2, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News, Taxonomy

A new strategic alliance was recently announced between Artstor and ITHAKA. This new partnership will benefit thousands of colleges, universities, schools, museums, and other educational institutions. This interesting information came to us from Library Technology in their article, “Alliance will enhance access to multimedia digital resources to support education and research.”

Artstor, JSTOR and ITHAKA were all created as mission-driven nonprofit organizations with initial support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Now together, they will be better able to collaborate in developing new tools and in taking advantage of core capabilities.

JSTOR was established in 1997 and merged with Ithaka in 2009, after which the combined entity was renamed “ITHAKA”. JSTOR is a cloud-based library where scholars, students and the public can access thousands of journals, books, images and other primary source content, as well as tools that promote research, teaching and sharing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Gathering the Big Data

February 2, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News

Data lakes have become more common and unfortunately as data – unstructured, semi-structured, and structured – continues to multiply at a phenomenally rapid pace, they will continue to be more frequent. This interesting information came to us from DataInformed in their article, “Avoiding Three Common Pitfalls of Data Lakes.”

A single repository for integration, access, and analytics purposes is rapidly emerging as the preferred way to manage big data initiatives, but it doesn’t come without pitfalls. There are also benefits. Data access is expedited and data are stored with minimal data preparation, further fostering the democratization of big data while reducing the complexity of its associated technologies. However the biggest advantage is the cost-effectiveness of data lake deployments.

The presence of big data and the massive quantities of information that organizations encounter daily has made these extremely scalable and cost-effective data lakes that are vital to contemporary data management.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Data Security is an Everyday Challenge

February 1, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News

It seems this is a news headline every day. Some organization has been breached and their data has been compromised. It has happened to insurance companies, large retailers and now a fast food chain. Wendy’s is investigating claims of a possible credit card breach at some of its locations. This information came to us from The Hill in their article, “Wendy’s probes possible credit card breach.”

Notified by their payment industry contact, there were reports of unusual activity involving payment cards at some of their restaurant locations. Those reports indicated that fraudulent charges may have occurred elsewhere after the cards were legitimately used at some branches of the fast-food chain.

Short of going back to using only cash, an individual or a business has little options but to use credit and/or debit cards. How can we be better protected against data hacks?

Short of identify theft software and programs, encryption by the retailers, and heightened security software, the best step any individual or organization can do is to be more aware. Monitor your statements closely, be judicious about who you hand your card to in a purchasing environments, and be aware of your surroundings.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Freedom of Access

January 29, 2016  
Posted in metadata, News

Digital archives exist to preserve data for infinitely long periods of time (hopefully). So it is interesting that the Spanish Supreme Court recently ruled on what is now known as “the right to be forgotten” when it comes to digital media. This interesting news came to us from El Pais, a daily newspaper in Spain, in their article, “Supreme Court rejects claim to alter digital newspaper archives.”

The Supreme Court judges rejected a petition by two individuals to have El Pais eliminate information from its online archive that they viewed as detrimental to them. The ruling specifically said newspapers were not under the obligation to alter their archives in order to delete all references to the names of these individuals. However, they did have an obligation to ensure that this information cannot be easily accessed through online search engines.

Further they said that such a move would represent “a disproportionate sacrifice of the right to freedom of information,” and “the so-called right to be forgotten cannot entail a retrospective censorship of information that was originally published correctly.”

I am sure many of us have wanted to delete our digital history at one time or another, but poor judgement on photos and social media status is different than re-writing events of history.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

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