Overwhelming Amount of Data

March 31, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News

The increasing digitization of information, combined with multiple vehicles that bring them to you and take information from you, can be overwhelming. Datamation brought this thought to us in their article, “Big Data: 9 Steps to Extract Insight from Unstructured Data.”

The pace of digital information is growing every day. According to industry researcher Gartner, about 80% of data held by an organization is unstructured data, consisting largely of information gathered from customer calls, emails, and social media feeds.

This growth of data, along with the added pressure to make records management user-friendly, leaves many organizations looking for outside help and alternatives.

One way to ensure findability, even with big data issues, is through a taxonomy. A standards-based taxonomy can help you provides clear order to your data, which enables comprehensive search results. Standards are key to a solid taxonomy and comprehensive indexing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Managing Your Data

March 30, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News

BooksoniX wants to help you get your data under control. Sounds like a huge undertaking, but in the world of publishing, managing your web-based book list can be quite the challenge. Maybe you already utilize ONIX data but it doesn’t validate properly and gets rejected by the likes of Nielsen, Bowker, and Barnes & Noble? BooksoniX runs it through their proprietary cleanup and validation tools to give you detailed feedback on any problems.

Once your data is on BooksoniX, they can set up the feeds to build on the current client relationships and expand them to new levels. It is that simple. You can sit back and wait for dissemination reports and as you add more and richer data, you’ll have additional options.

Few industries have been experiencing as many changes as the publishing world. Anything that can make the data more accessible for the users is worthy of consideration.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Managing the Email Chaos

March 27, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, storage

There is much chatter about email since the latest Washington brouhaha involving Hillary Clinton’s use of private email at the State Department. Of course, this comes on the coattails of Lois Lerner’s missing emails at the IRS last year and puts extra pressure on the upcoming deadlines for the implementation of electronic email recordkeeping from the Office of Management and Budget. This interesting topic came from GCN in their article, “A practical approach to email records management.”

The Federal Records Act (FRA) and National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) regulations  require that government employees treat email messages created or received in the course of official business as federal records and manage them accordingly.

Even in civilian organizations, managing email data and storage is a challenge. We know that email isn’t going anywhere, at least anytime soon. So the key is to create a document storage strategy that will enable discovery easily and with comprehensive results. Taxonomies can help with this.

How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Capturing the data is only part of the project. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Sharing the Knowledge

March 27, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, storage

Information professionals are often the last people brought onto projects involving digital asset management (DAM) teams and other project teams. Why is this? They bring a perspective that connects everyone’s interest and investment in the final outcome. They can remove themselves from the territory problems and turf wars by asking the important and simple questions, like “What are you trying to do?” CMS Wire brought this news to our attention in their article, “Library Science, Not Library Silence.”

Information professionals bring power and knowledge to the table. For example, let’s look at the taxonomy. Who else will know where to start? Their perspective is informed, educated, and skilled. And that is just the beginning. Don’t overlook the experts on any project.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Not All Systems Are Equal

March 25, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, search

It may be possible that analytics engines could now take what was once the area of e-discovery and make effective enterprise search a reality across all company information. Search Content Management brought this news to our attention in their article, “How analytics engines could — finally — relieve enterprise search pain.”

This may not seem like amazingly exciting news, but I am sure the legal departments in organizations will be happy to hear this. All records management systems need a system of indexing to create findability. We know that indexing against a strong, standards-based taxonomy can ensure comprehensive search results. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ISO/ANSI/NISO compliant taxonomies to produce comprehensive results.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Keeping Your Personal Information Secure

March 24, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News, storage

Australians fear that their government isn’t capable of handling their personal information, despite a new law not yet implemented that is intended to stop terrorism. This interesting news came from the Financial Review in their article,”Poll shows Australians not sold on data retention.”

The government has that said the increased powers are necessary tools in the battle against terrorism and crimes being organized online. Based on a recent survey, Australians do not agree and do not trust their personal data in the government’s hands.

The survey sought to test how well Australians understand the stated scope of the legislation, as well as to gauge views on the broader implications of the government’s new powers.

Data security is important. So is access to data. It can be achieved by creating strong taxonomies. Proper indexing against a strong standards-based taxonomy increases the findability of data. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Where Does Your Data Come From?

March 20, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News

Wearable data devices have evolved way past the frustratingly inaccurate pedometers of the 1990s. Newer devices no longer just count steps (accurately, I might add), they monitor heart rates and sleep efficiency, and can nag you about your diet, if you so choose. Some devices are even adding other capabilities, like the ability to send tweets, read messages, and make purchases. DATAVERSITY brought this news to our attention in their article, “Big Data Insights from Wearable Tech.”

The data collected by these wearable devices reveal a lot of information about the users, and, as you can imagine, companies want their hands on it. The possibilities are endless in the user-specific marketing world once that data has been acquired on personal fitness trends and ways people like to exercise.

Data is key to making these connections. Managing that data in a way it is useable and findable is important.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Data, Data, Data

March 20, 2015  
Posted in metadata, News

Data is important, but just how important if it has no structure? After all, without structure, how can it be indexed and recovered when needed down the road? In real-world applications, there have to be patterns and structures that allow content to be findable. Ontologies, taxonomies, indexing, metadata, tags — whatever approach you use must still utilize structure. This interesting information came from DATAVERSITY, in their article, “Big Data Is Not the Death Knell of ETL.”

Structure is the contextual matrix within which the data’s value is realized. Structure is either built into the data from its inception or added to it subsequently. Ontologies and other controlled vocabularies help ensure that machine-assisted or fully automated indexing is comprehensive, regardless of what you are indexing. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies to make their information findable.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Learn More About Making Content Usable

March 19, 2015  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, search

The “Making Content Portable, Making It Usable” webinar is scheduled for March 27th. Early bird registration discount ends on Friday, March 20th.

The National Federation of Advanced Information Services (NFAIS) is bringing this interesting educational opportunity to members and non-members.

With all the interest in making content portable and usable for research and the scholarly community, this webinar is timely in helping users decide what is most important for content providers. What are the trends around improving workflow to facilitate and ease access to quality information? How can we optimize this workflow across the array of devices available today?

The presenters include Bill Detmer, MD, MScPresident, Unbound Medicine; Jeff Lang, Platform Manager, Web Editions, The American Chemical Society; Alex Salkever, Head of Growth/Product Marketing, BD, Silk.co; Roger C. Schonfeld, Director, Library and Scholarly Communication Program, Ithaka S+R; and Ron Snyder, Director of Advanced Technologies, ITHAKA/JSTOR.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Finding the Lost

March 17, 2015  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, search

Technology continues to advance on a daily basis. What was wondrously new yesterday will seem archaic in just a few months. This advancement of technology has brought information to our fingertips at a faster speed than ever before, and in extraordinary quantities. KMWorld brought this news to our attention in their article, “Universal, federated or unified search in the land of information silos.”

Information access and retrieval within most organizations is not a smooth process. Few organizations have one simple search system for all their data. Most have multiple options, and that number grows with the size of the organization. The challenge with this situation is not allowing the data to become entities in and of themselves – entities that create walls of division.

Taxonomies and other controlled vocabularies help ensure that machine-assisted or fully automated indexing is comprehensive, regardless of what you are indexing. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies to make their information findable.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

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