Learn More About Taxonomies

October 22, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

Whether you are a Heather Hedden groupie or just a taxonomist looking to enhance your skillset, this workshop might be up your alley. Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science is featuring The Accidental Taxonomist herself in a workshop titled, “Taxonomies and Controlled Vocabularies“. Two five-week workshop series, one starting in January 2015 and the other in March 2015, will take you through best practices for how to create terms, relationships, and variants for different kinds of taxonomies or controlled vocabularies. You will also be introduced to different software tools.

Whether you need to create a taxonomy to organize information on a web site, classify information in a content management system, establish a controlled vocabulary for a periodical or database indexing project, or simply understand how to use them better, this workshop will get you on your way.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Classifying Men?

October 22, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, Taxonomy

I am still surprised at the variety of taxonomies I find, and I typically find them in the oddest places. The latest one came from ECNS in their article, “Male outcast taxonomy.” Though not a true taxonomy, its classification efforts are as unique as the topic.

Developing a classification system organized into conceptually similar categories can help users gain a better understanding of the taxonomy subject area. It is important to remember the value of a solid taxonomy and its role in the search process. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations has extensive experience in constructing taxonomies for academic publishers, and can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Adding to the Data

October 22, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, search

The European Training Thesaurus (ETT) is Cedefop’s controlled vocabulary used to index the VET-Bib (the Reference Library of Vocational Education and Training in Europe) bibliographic database. Cedefop is the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training. This interesting news came straight from the source in their release, “Cedefop’s European Training Thesaurus – new descriptors – 2014 update.”

Over 100 new descriptor terms were added in 2014 to keep track of VET development and to assist researchers in tweaking their search strategies. Now all new descriptors of the European Training Thesaurus are sorted by microthesauri and have been fully integrated in VET-Bib database for searchability and findability.

Information being findable is the result of good indexing and comprehensive metatagging. Automated indexing is a comprehensive approach to making content findable. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies with integrated indexing rule bases to make their information findable.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Classifying Similarities

October 21, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, Taxonomy

What do legal jurisdictions and leprechauns have in common? More than one might think. In the world of classification, words like extinct and endangered could be applied to both and many more genres. This interesting topic came from the law magazine, Slaw, in their article, “Of Unicorns and Leprechauns: Applying the Threatened Species Taxonomy to Administrative Law.”

The depth and the variety of subjects is a perfect illustration of why organizations need a content management system that accommodates multiple descriptors/keywords/subject terms/whatever from a taxonomy or thesaurus. Developing a classification system organized into conceptually similar categories can help users gain a better understanding of the taxonomy subject area. How the content is classified impacts the findability of your data. Professionals should look for an experienced builder of solid standards-based taxonomies to associate content for appropriate machine-assisted indexing. Access Innovations can provide solutions that are ANSI compliant.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Not the TEXAS You Would Think

October 21, 2014  
Posted in News, semantic

Though it is a little short notice, it seemed important to let you know of a workshop at the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP) in Doha, Qatar, called “TEXAS: Taxonomy Extraction with Applications in Semantics” that may be of interest to those in the field.

The workshop addresses the importance of taxonomies in knowledge-based systems. Hierarchical structures provide valuable input in knowledge-intensive applications such as question answering and textual entailment and are useful tools for browsing and navigation of document collections, especially when applied for exploration and discovery. The TEXAS workshop aims to provide a venue for presenting and discussing approaches that evaluate taxonomy extraction.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

 

Extensive Project Involves Über-Classification

October 21, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News

Researchers at the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Infection and Global Health are building the world’s most comprehensive database describing human and animal pathogens. This big data project will be used to prevent and tackle disease outbreaks around the globe. This interesting information came from Phys.org in their article, “Using ‘Big Data’ approach to map relationships between human and animal diseases.” The Enhanced Infectious Diseases (EID2) database has been developed by the Liverpool University Climate and Infectious Diseases of Animals (LUCINDA) team and is funded by a BBSRC Strategic Tools and Resources Development Fund grant.

EID2 is using openly accessible information in a new way and thereby tracing the history of human and animal diseases to predict the effects of climate change on pathogens and in turn to produce maps showing which diseases are most likely in particular areas and to categorize the complex relationships between human and animal carriers and hosts of numerous pathogens. The project has far-reaching possibilities. It will be interesting to watch as it develops and evolves.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Grants Available for Taxonomic Research

October 20, 2014  
Posted in News, Taxonomy

The Australian Biological Resources Study (ABRS) program at the University of Queensland provides grants to honors, master’s, and Ph.D. students for taxonomic research. Specifically, the ABRS program offers three-year research and postdoctoral fellowship grants for researchers whose primary aim is to undertake taxonomic research on the Australian biota or to develop products that aid in the dissemination of taxonomic information on the Australian biota.

They also offer capacity‑building grants for taxonomic and systematics research on Australian flora and fauna in the form of honors, master’s and Ph.D. awards.

The award value peaks at $90,000, which could be a huge help towards achieving a career milestone. There is still time left before the deadline of October 31, 2014 to apply. More details can be found here.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

 

Data Collections

October 20, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News

Researchers at the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Infection and Global Health are building the world’s most comprehensive database describing human and animal pathogens. This big data project will be used to prevent and tackle disease outbreaks around the globe. This interesting information came from Phys.org in their article, “Using ‘Big Data’ approach to map relationships between human and animal diseases.” The Enhanced Infectious Diseases (EID2) database has been developed by the Liverpool University Climate and Infectious Diseases of Animals (LUCINDA) team and is funded by a BBSRC Strategic Tools and Resources Development Fund grant.

EID2 is using openly accessible information in a new way and thereby tracing the history of human and animal diseases to predict the effects of climate change on pathogens. The project will be using these predictions to produce maps showing which diseases are most likely in particular areas and to categorize the complex relationships between human and animal carriers and hosts of numerous pathogens. The project has far-reaching possibilities. It will be interesting to watch as it develops and evolves.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Taxonomy Classification of Internet Access

October 17, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, Taxonomy, Technology

An interesting classification scheme draft was posted on October 6 by the Internet Engineering Task Force. You can view it here. The Alternative Network Deployments Taxonomy and characterization draft deals with available technologies (including alternative ones for use in developing countries) for Internet access.

The document presents a taxonomy of alternative network deployments and a set of definitions and shared characteristics. The term itself includes a set of network models that have emerged in the past twenty or so years with the aim of bringing Internet connectivity to people.

It is definitely important to choose the right partner in technology, especially when your content is in their hands, whether that is on your own servers or on the Internet via the clouds. Access Innovations is known as a leader in database production, standards development, and creating and applying taxonomies, and one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Data Everywhere

October 17, 2014  
Posted in metadata, News, storage

Data in every form, including digital and print, is growing at an exponential rate. According to the National Science Foundation, 90 percent of the data in existence today was created in the last two years. This interesting information was found on Federal News Radio in their article, “Data retention & records management.” The Presidential Directive on Managing Government Records, and initiatives such as the Open Data Policy, have begun to address this critical situation, but this is only the beginning.

In 2012, the Presidential Directive on Managing Government Records was issued. This is an unfunded mandate that targets 2019 as the year that federal agencies need to complete their transition to digital records. Some believe that the federal government has reached a critical tipping point in terms of records and information management. What options do the agencies have to position themselves for better management, governance, information access and transparency?

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Next Page »