My favorite M.A.I upgrades in Data Harmony v3.9, continued

April 23, 2014  
Posted in Access Insights, Autoindexing, News

I like the variety of exports available. We’re still creating custom ones for content and web content management systems that require specialized formats, and we’ll continue to do that. But now we can offer exports of limited (top) levels of a hierarchy and exports that include only the fields that you want. There’s no need to share editorial comments and term origin information if you don’t want to. And it’s possible to run an export with just related terms or just editorial notes when that’s what you need for vocabulary review. These are seemingly small changes that can make a big difference.

Data Harmony is becoming more verbose, too. It has more messages to let you know that your export or import has been successful (or messages to let you know why not!). It also has more reports (and more on the way). We love hearing from our users, and much of the new verbosity results from suggestions our users have made.

Mary Garcia, Systems Analyst
Access Innovations

 

Opening up the Libraries

April 23, 2014  
Posted in indexing, News, reference

Malyn Newitt, formerly of King’s College London and Exeter University, was recently quoted, on the topic of the National Trust, as saying:

“We take care of historic houses, gardens, mills, coastlines, forests, woods, fens, beaches, farmland, moorland, islands, archaeological remains, nature reserves, villages and pubs – and then we open them up for ever, for everyone.”

Newitt continues to point out that while the National Trust’s work in this regard has been invaluable, one specific group has fallen short of being “open to everyone” – the books that are housed in their libraries.

Amidst the historic houses that have been preserved by the National Trust and made available to the general public include “140 historic libraries (around 230,000 books in 400,000 volumes)…Many are country house libraries, some collected by wealthy bibliophiles, others containing more practical everyday books, including rare provincial printing.”

The Trust’s Curator of Libraries has set out to catalog these collections, and concerted efforts are also underway to repair and conserve the books themselves. The Scholarly Kitchen brought this interesting topic to our attention in their article, “Public Access to Public Books: The Case of the National Trust.”

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Achieving True Findability Requires Standards

April 23, 2014  
Posted in News, search, Standards, Taxonomy

WAND has launched its WAND Taxonomy Library Portal that provides resources for companies who are developing a taxonomy strategy by giving access to more than 100,000 pre-built taxonomy concepts developed by experts. This interesting news came from Digital Journal in their article, “WAND Announces Launch of New Taxonomy Portal.”

When considering using a content management system’s taxonomy feature or pre-manufactured taxonomies, we will always argue for a system for managing taxonomies and business rules to interpret content and apply taxonomy terms that is easily integrated with other systems using APIs and web services calls; that is transparent and human-understandable; that is available to support users as they upload and tag their own content; and that supports searchers by extending to them the full semantic richness of the taxonomy.

True findability can be achieved only when you index against a solid, standards-based taxonomy. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies and associated rule bases for machine-assisted indexing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

My favorite M.A.I upgrades in Data Harmony v3.9

April 22, 2014  
Posted in Access Insights, Autoindexing, News

I think the changes in the TestMAI function are really exciting. If you’re loading files from a directory, Data Harmony now remembers that directory rather than requiring you to find the full path each time. And, once you have loaded or pasted in text to index and press the M.A.I. button, in addition to seeing the suggested terms, you see the matches that activated rules to suggest those terms – or not; it’s really easy to turn off the highlighting with a Ctrl+L key press. And perhaps best of all, you can use the new Find function to go to each instance of the text string, work, or phrase that you type in the search box. And no asterisks needed! All of these are small improvements that actually make a very big difference in editor productivity.

I feel empowered by the MAIBatch feature that’s been added to the Admin Module. Rather than having to ask the programming department, or running through a series of scripts to tease out the indexing terms that would be applied to a group of sample documents, I can use a user-interface powered MAIBatch function. I wouldn’t do a thousand content items with it — not because it can’t handle them, but because it may take a while if the items are Word or PDF files — but it works really nicely with a few directories of sample text items. You can see right away which terms are ‘noisy’ and can identify indexing terms that are being missed. Since it works on groups of files, outliers can be disregarded and new terms can be more easily discovered when you’re examining groups of files that are in new areas or describing new processes.

And there’s more! Watch for Part 2 tomorrow.

 

Mary Garcia, Systems Analyst
Access Innovations, Inc.

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Siri on Steroids?

April 22, 2014  
Posted in News, semantic, Technology

A powerful new invention that could apply to a future version of Siri has been patented by Apple. It is designed to work with distributed sensors that a user could place throughout a home, office, or beyond. It’s an advanced reminder system that could notify you that it’s time to take your medications or that you have appointments or meetings, in any room equipped with the appropriate sensors. This interesting news was found on Patently Apple in their announcement, “Apple Wins Patent for a Surprisingly Futuristic Version of Siri that Includes Distributing Sensors throughout your Home or Office.”

The patent relating to intelligent systems and more specifically to tools for building classes of applications for intelligent automated assistants like Siri is likely to bring about more space-age convenience.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Data Harmony, a unit of Access Innovations, the world leader in indexing and making content findable.

Genealogy Work Takes an Odd Turn

April 22, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, search

We all know that the Mormon church is famous for genealogy and the indexing process to maintain such informative and detailed records. Their new approach to indexing is interesting, to say the least. This interesting news came from the Standard-Examiner in Ogden, Utah in their article, “Inmates stay busy at Davis County Jail with Mormon name indexing.”

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) is now offering a family history indexing course at the Davies County Jail in addition to its typical ministering work there. Instructors ask inmates to sift through records up to hundreds of years old and determine names as part of the religion’s genealogy work.

The church proposed the unique program to the Utah Sheriff’s Association in 2012 and donated laptops and other equipment. After required security precautions were taken to prevent access to the broad Internet, the classes started in 2013. Over 2,250 names were cataloged by Davis County inmates in 2013, and almost 175,000 were completed throughout the state. The LDS Church said it expects that figure to reach about 2 million statewide in 2014.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Miles Conrad Memorial Lecture Available for Viewing

April 21, 2014  
Posted in Access Insights, News

A few weeks ago, we proudly announced Marjorie (Margie) M. K. Hlava’s impending Miles Conrad Memorial Lecture and award from the National Federation of Advanced Information Services (NFAIS). Margie delivered her lecture, “Tales from the Field: Our Changing World” on February 24, 2014, during the 2014 NFAIS Annual Conference to a standing-room-only audience.

A video and the PowerPoint slides are both available now on the Access Innovations website.

The objective of the Miles Conrad Memorial Lecture, established in 1965 in commemoration of NFAIS founder G. Miles Conrad, is to recognize and honor those members of the information community who have made significant contributions to the field of information science and to NFAIS itself.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

Making Information Accessible

April 21, 2014  
Posted in indexing, metadata, News, search, storage

Technology is finding use for object storage systems, such as big data circles and more specifically in vertical markets such as oil and gas, and media and entertainment. This interesting news came from Search Storage in their article, “Object storage systems in demand for big data, archiving.”

In these markets, scalability is crucial for extremely large amounts of data. They also want more than just storage; they want analytics and flexibility. Many cloud service reporters cited object storage as the best way to continue to scale their environment with a single-level platform.

Access to data that is in storage is important. It can be achieved by creating strong taxonomies. Proper indexing against a strong standards-based taxonomy increases the findability of data. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Digitizing Microscopic Creatures

April 18, 2014  
Posted in indexing, News

A soil fauna collection is housed in the Senckenberg Museum of Natural History in Görlitz. As in many other natural history museums, the tiny creatures are embedded in a water-soluble medium and mounted on slides to be studied under a light microscope, described in minute detail, accurately identified and cataloged. But with this method, the specimens only have a limited lifespan, and entire collections are at risk.

The museum hopes to document the collection using light microscopy and “photographic focusing”. A project team intends to record and gather all the data and information relating to objects in the collection and make it available through an internet platform. Eureka Alert brought this news to our attention in their article, “New knowledge from old collections: DFG supports indexing and digitization of research-relevant objects.”

This ambitious project is utilizing digital transformation for the virtual preservation of three-dimensional microbial objects in scientific collections, and storing the data in databases. This enables researchers all over the world to exchange information on the microbes via the internet and to view relevant objects.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in thesaurus, ontology, and taxonomy creation and metadata application.

Finding Solutions in the Clouds

April 18, 2014  
Posted in indexing, News, search

AirVault recently announced that Frontier Airlines has licensed the AirVault Records Management Solution as its new, web-based record management system for aircraft maintenance and business operations. This interesting information came from Geeks World in their article, ‘Frontier Airlines Chooses AirVault’ Cloud-Computing Records Management System  for Aircraft Maintenance and Business Operations.”

This will provide an innovative cloud-computing method to manage the airline’s aircraft maintenance records and supposedly increase efficiency for its growing fleet of Airbus A319s and A320s. The AirVault Cloud  Computing Service platform will manage other business records applications for the airline including finance, legal, and human resources.

It is so very important to choose a product that makes your content findable – easily and thoroughly. Access Innovations is one of a very small number of companies able to help its clients generate ANSI/ISO/W3C-compliant taxonomies and associated rule bases for machine-assisted indexing.

Melody K. Smith

Sponsored by Access Innovations, the world leader in taxonomies, metadata, and semantic enrichment to make your content findable.

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